The life and times of Apple cofounder Steve Wozniak, who turns 65 today

Apple cofounder Steve Wozniak turned 65 on Tuesday.

While the late Steve Jobs is remembered as the visionary who brought Apple’s products to the world, Wozniak is known as the engineering brain who built the first Apple computers.

Wozniak ends his 2006 autobiography, “iWoz: From Computer Geek to Cult Icon,” with one, simple line of advice: “And have fun doing it.” 

In honour of his birthday, we’re looking back at some of his biggest accomplishments. 

That hasn't stopped thousands of Apple fanboys from making the trip to the former Jobs home each year.

Instagram Embed:

http://instagram.com/p/iRiP52NKbL/embed/

Width: 800px

In 1977, Wozniak designed the Apple II, which went on to become one of the first majorly successful personal computers available for mass purchase. Here Jobs, then Apple CEO John Sculley, and Wozniak showed off the Apple IIc. Revealed in April 1984, the computer was Apple's first attempt at a portable model.

Sal Veder / AP Images

In 1986, he finished his degree in electrical engineering at the University of California in Berkeley, graduating using the name Rocky Raccoon Clark to keep his identity secret. He had first attended Berkeley in 1971, but ended up taking a break to work on Apple. Don't call him a college dropout, though -- he told the Los Angeles Times, 'I simply took a year off to earn money for my fourth year of school. And then my career kept going up.'

BILL BEATTIE / AP Images

Source: Los Angeles Times

In 1982 and 1983, he helped sponsor the US Festival, a kind of cross between a computer conference and a music festival.

LENNOX MCLENDON / AP Images

In 1986, Wozniak helped design his family home, a sleek-looking house with six bedrooms and 7,500 square feet of space. The Los Gatos home recently sold for $3.9 million, though the Wozniak family hasn't lived there in several years.

Sotheby's International Realty

Tour the home »

He's launched a number of other personal projects since Apple, including CL 9, which built the first universal remote. He also founded Wheels of Zeus, which developed a wireless GPS technology, and spent a few years teaching grade school. In 2002, he joined the board of directors for Danger, Inc., which made PDA devices.

PAUL SAKUMA / AP Images

Wozniak definitely knows how to have fun. In 2009, he made an appearance on ABC's 'Dancing with the Stars.'

YouTube, WozTV

In his spare time, Wozniak likes to play Segway polo with his hometown team, the Silicon Valley Aftershocks.

Scott Beale / Laughing Squid

Here he is playing in the 2009 Segway polo world championship, which has been named the Woz Challenge Cup in his honour.

Hermann J. Knippertz / AP Images

Source: California Magazine

He's often spotted riding a Segway around his hometown, Los Gatos.

Paul Sakuma / AP Images

Wozniak plans to retire in Australia. He currently works as an adjunct professor at the University of Technology in Sydney, communicating with students in the school's Magic Lab via video chat.

Mark Wilson/Getty Image

Source: New York Times, CNET

NOW WATCH: Tech Insider videos

Want to read a more in-depth view on the trends influencing Australian business and the global economy? BI / Research is designed to help executives and industry leaders understand the major challenges and opportunities for industry, technology, strategy and the economy in the future. Sign up for free at research.businessinsider.com.au.