I visited The Goods Mart, an LA-based convenience store that’s like a healthy version of 7-Eleven. Here’s a look inside its newest store.

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You’ll find organic, natural, and healthy alternatives to corner store staples in either of The Goods Mart’s two locations. Katie Canales/Business Insider
  • The Goods Mart is all about healthy alternatives to convenience store staples.
  • The store swaps sugary icees for Kombucha slushies and generic toilet paper for Seventh Generation products.
  • The company opened its first location in LA’s Silver Lake neighbourhood earlier this year.
  • Their New York brick-and-mortar opened in October. I paid the shop a visit to see what a healthy version of 7-Eleven looks like.

You won’t find a Snickers Bar or a bag of Lays potato chips in one of The Goods Mart‘s stores.

Instead, you’ll find healthier alternatives that directly cater to a growing market of health-conscious consumers.

I visited the company’s New York location to see what the healthy convenience store is all about.

Here’s what it’s like.


The Goods Mart, an LA-based company, opened a New York location in the city’s SoHo neighbourhood in October.

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Source: Grub Street


The company’s first location sprang up in LA’s Silver Lake neighbourhood back in April of 2018.

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The store’s hours displayed outside of its New York shop. Katie Canales/Business Insider

Source: LA Times


The New York shop shares the block with a number of upscale clothing boutiques.

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There’s also a WeWork down the street, one of the co-working company’s many locations in the city.

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Source: Google Maps


The store aims to provide “upgrades to typical convenience store staples.”

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Source: The Goods Mart


That means healthier and more environmentally-friendly options than what could be found at your average corner store, like a 7-Eleven.

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A 7-Eleven on Broadway in New York, a few blocks from the Business Insider office. Katie Canales/Business Insider

Source: The Goods Mart


The website states that its products have no artificial sweeteners, colours, flavours, or growth hormones. So think healthier versions of Starbursts and Snickers Bars.

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Source: The Goods Mart


Seats fashioned out of plastic buckets sit outside the New York store — a nice touch.

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This is what you see when you first walk in. It feels nothing like a 7-Eleven.

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To your left is a hand sanitizing station.

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And to your right are shelves stocking chips and other light, healthy snacks.

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An island holding items takes up the middle of the pint-sized shop.

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Next to the chip-lined shelves is a bulletin board inviting customers to pin things for everyone to see.

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There’s also a tablet displaying promotional videos from brands stocked in the store, like Clif Bar and Jackson’s Honest.

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You can get a frozen cheese pizza for $US9.95 or a Margherita pizza for $US11.95.

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There’s a microwave right above the fridge if you want to heat up a pizza on the spot.

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You can also microwave a $US5.50 burrito made by the creator of West Coast favourite, Burritos La Palma.

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The coffee station is also near the microwave.

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You can get an 8-ounce cup of Nitro cold brew for $US2.45 …

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… or opt for a popular choice: A self-serve 8-ounce cup of regular joe, supplied by La Colombe Coffee Roasters. It costs $US1.25.

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Source: Eater


Rows of cups line the counter next to the coffee machine, just as you’d see in your average convenience store.

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Next to the coffee machines is the buzzed-about slushy machines.

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Reusable straws are available for purchase, if you’re really a slushy aficionado.

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The metal straws cost $US2 each and the glass straws cost $US4. Katie Canales/Business Insider

I was looking forward to one of the store’s Kombucha slushies, which were also available at the company’s Silver Lake store opening back in April.

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Source: Fast Company


But the shopkeeper told me that their Kombucha slushies were more of a summer thing, so I went for what they had available: a Local Roots apple cider concoction. It was delicious.

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I downed every bite, despite the 40-degree weather outside.

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Fear not! The store wasn’t completely void of Kombucha. You can still buy a bottle of the fermented beverage if you please, sans the slushy consistency.

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I turned my attention back to the white marble island, holding things like spices, olive oil …

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… and organic Basmati rice.

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I got excited when the shopkeeper showed me that the island was actually a Lazy Susan!

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She spun it around for me to survey its contents.

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There are toiletries, like this shampoo and conditioner that cost $US12.95 each.

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And some Schmidt’s deodorant for $US11.95 a pop.

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There are household items too, like Seventh Generation disinfectant wipes.

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Fruits, veggies, and other goodies lay atop the Lazy Susan.

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You can pick up an apple for 50¢.

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Or pay 75¢ or $US1 for a banana or a pear, respectively.

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All of the veggies and fruit are “cosmetically challenged,” provided by local companies whose deformed produce was rejected by bigger grocery stores.

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Perhaps the biggest clue that this was not your average convenience store is the Gwyneth Paltrow-branded Goop product next to the deformed potatoes. I couldn’t bring myself to pay $US2.50 for “superpowder.”

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I went to check out the other side of the store instead.

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There are quinoa cups, gluten free oatmeal, and organic Pop-Tart alternatives.

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I also spotted some ingredients to make meals, like a box of organic pasta from local shop Sfoglini for $US6.45.

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There are wholegrain rice crackers, a reasonable alternative to something greasier and salty, like potato chips.

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I knew I wouldn’t leave without buying a bag of these chile picante-flavored plantain chips (spoiler: they’re addicting.)

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And only 140 calories a serving!

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Some chocolate bars sit near the plantain chips.

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As do some Chewie Fruities, which I knew could be my Starburst replacement …

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… and some Justin’s peanut butter cups, priced at $US2.45, would appease my chocolate cravings.

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Peanut and almond butter from the same company are priced at $US5.45 and $US14.95, respectively.

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Granola bars, from brands like Clif and Kind, are stocked too.

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You can buy milk, orange juice, and other drinks.

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And single servings of yogurt are for sale, like Chobani for $US2.25.

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While I was there, a flow of customers came and went.

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Some looked like they had stumbled in for the first time, while others were clearly regulars.

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The shopkeeper told me that members from the nearby women’s community, The Wing, come in often, as do employees from the WeWork on the corner.

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Read more:
See inside The Wing, the popular women-only coworking space and club


Before I left, I rounded up a few things to try.

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I went with the plantain chips, a package of Justin’s peanut butter cups, and a pack of Chewie Fruities. Everything was tasty. Maybe it was just because I knew I had shopped at a fancy, high-end convenience store, but I felt like I didn’t have a junk food coma after the fact, like I would after eating food from a conventional store.

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I also picked up a container of oatmeal for breakfast. Katie Canales/Business Insider

My total came out to $US10.89 — probably more than what I would have spent on similar items at a convenience store like 7-Eleven.

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I could have bought a handy dandy Goods Mart bag for $US15 to carry my healthy goodies out.

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The bag’s design matches the store’s criss-crossed ceiling display, a consistent theme in The Goods Mart’s branding.

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It will likely be featured in future Goods Mart locations in New York, California, and Michigan where the founder plans to expand.

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Source: Gothamist