The First Pictures Of The Heroic Fukushima Workers

fukushima milk

Photo: AP

Inside the Fukushima Nuclear Plant, a small group of heroes is working to prevent meltdown.There are 200 engineers, scientists and volunteers working in shifts of 50 at a time. The try to monitor explosions when escaped hydrogen gas combusts on contact with Oxygen.

These heroic workers are exposed to 100 – 200 millisieverts of radiation and face a high risk of death by radiation.

The Fukushima 50 were the first group of workers who remained on site when the plant was burning on March 15

In this photo released by Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency, Tokyo Electric Power Co. workers collect data in the control room for Unit 1 and Unit 2 at the tsunami-crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okumamachi, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan, Wednesday, March 23, 2011. (AP Photo/Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency)

They face high levels of radiation but work to collect data and check safety levels

In this photo released by Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency, Tokyo Electric Power Co. workers collect data in the control room for Unit 1 and Unit 2 at the tsunami-crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okumamachi, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan, Wednesday, March 23, 2011. (AP Photo/Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency)

When they take a break, the workers rest and eat in a small decontaminated room

In this photo released by Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency, a Tokyo Electric Power Co. worker looks at gauges in the control room for Unit 1 and Unit 2 at the tsunami-crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okumamachi, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan, Wednesday, March 23, 2011. (AP Photo/Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency)

Here workers in protective gear try to restore electricity

In this photo taken on on March 18, 2011 and released on Wednesday, March 23, 2011 by Tokyo Electric Power Co. via Kyodo News, workers connect transmission lines to restore electric power supply to Unit 3 and Unit 4 at the tsunami-crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okumamachi, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan. (AP Photo/Tokyo Electric Power Co. via Kyodo News)

Part of their job is ensuring that the plants are constantly cooled

In this photo released by Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO) , workers in protective suits conduct cooling operation by spraying water at the damaged No. 4 unit of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear complex in Okumamachi, northeastern Japan,Tuesday, March 22, 2011.

The international limit for radiation exposure for nuclear workers is 20 millisievert per year, these workers face much worse

In this handout photo taken from a video footage released by Tokyo Metro Fire Department Tuesday, March 22, 2011, Tokyo Metro firefighters in protective suites listen to operational briefing before they go out to set up to spray water at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear complex in Okumamachi, northeastern Japan, Friday, March 18, 2011. (AP Photo/Tokyo Metro Fire Department)

Japan Self-defence Force cools unit 3, workers constantly have to leave the plant because of spikes in radiation levels

In this image taken from footage released by the Japan defence Ministry, a fire engine from the Japan Self-defence Forces sprays water toward Unit 3 of the troubled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear complex on Friday, March 18, 2011. In the backgrounds is Unit 4. Military fire trucks sprayed the reactor units Friday for a second day, with tons of water arching over the facility in attempts to prevent the fuel from overheating and emitting dangerous levels of radiation. (AP Photo/Japan defence Ministry)

A port worker in a coastal city close to the Fukushima plant hopes to rebuild his home

Hoping to rebuild, port worker Mitsuyoshi Abe stands in the street of his wife's hair salon strewn with tsunami debris, in Soma, Fukushima prefecture, Japan, Wednesday, March 23, 2011. Soma sits in the shadow of Fukushima Dai-ichi, a crippled nuclear facility that was badly damaged by the tsunami and has been spewing radioactivity into the air and sea, forcing tens of thousands to flee or hunker down indoors. (AP Photo/Wally Santana)

Locals have to screen food for contamination and carefully dispose of it

Dairy farmer Kenichi Hasegawa watches as he dumps milk in a corn field in Iitatemura, Fukushima Prefecture, northeastern Japan, Wednesday, March 23, 2011. (AP Photo/Yomiuri Shimbun, Takuya Yoshino)

Now here's a look at Japan in the aftermath of the earthquake and tsunami...

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