Steve Jobs’ Clothing Through The Years

steve jobs

Photo: Dan Frommer, Business Insider

This is Steve Jobs’ wardrobe evolution since 1998, the year he returned to command Apple as interim CEO. You gotta admire a man who is loyal to his style no matter what. But my favourite Jobs is the old school Jobs.After he returned to Apple, it was all Levi’s, New Balances and black sweaters. One day I saw him wearing a suit—kind of—in a MacWorld Japan keynote, but that was it.

Back in the 70s and 80s his wardrobe used to be a mix of everything, from walking around the Apple campus barefoot in a t-shirt and shorts to old school three-piece suits to show his computers in fairs and keynotes. Check out the gallery for some of his favourite looks through those years.

Top image modified from Fast Company’s original.

This post originally appeared on Gizmodo.

Turtleneck with a hole, dreamy look, emo hipster. I love Woz's Jesuschrist hair. These was the very beginning.

Another photo of his very early years. You could see the black and jeans combo appearing there.

I wish I could get this striped sweater for sweatermaster Sam Biddle. What a classic.

Classic TV appearance. I don't know what's better, the corduroy jacket or that awesome hair and beard.

Presenting his newborn babies in his best pinstripe suit.

Young steve also wore three-piece suits, like IBM executives. And Diane Keaton (with whom he had a relation).

If they told me Steve Jobs was Spanish when looking at this photo, I would totally believe it. He looks exactly like one of my uncles back in the 70s.

A total classic. The brown lumberjack shirt. The mustache. Everything.

During his exile at Next, after being ousted by some sugar water salesman named John Sculley, he didn't change his style much.

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