The Cronulla Sharks Have Offered Daly Cherry-Evans The Most Lucrative Deal In NRL History

Daly Cherry-Evans. Photo: Renee McKay/ Getty.

The Cronulla Sharks have reportedly offered Manly Sea Eagles gun Daly Cherry-Evans the most lucrative deal in NRL history.

Currently the richest players in the competition are football legends Cameron Smith and Johnathan Thurston, both taking home a $1 million pay packet for every season.

While the dollar figure of the offer has not yet been released The Sydney Morning Herald reports it is expected to be a seven-figure-per-season deal.

Should Cherry-Evans agree to a contract it will be a huge win for Cronulla which recently secured Ben Barba from Brisbane. Having played junior football together in Mackay, the Barba and Cherry-Evans pairing could be one of the most lethal scrumbase combinations in the game.

Before Cherry-Evans, Jarryd Hayne was the lastest NRL player to be offered a mega deal. Had he taken it, Hayne would have been the next highest-paid player in the code’s history but rejected the offer to pursue a career in the NFL.

He was not the only star to leave the code this season. Clive Churchill medalist Sam Burgess and international sensation Sonny Bill Williams have both headed to international rugby union teams to take a place in next year’s World Cup.

Following the departures, NRL chief executive Dave Smith called on the league to take action before more star players call it quits, begging the question: Should we expect more million-dollar deals to come?

All eyes will next be on another Manly player Keiran Foran, who comes off contract after next season. He too is expected to attract an offer worth around $1 million a season.

The game’s current NRL salary cap stands at $5.5 million per team for the top 25 players. Outside of that, one player from each club can earn $600,000 as the Marquee Player which Cronulla still has funds available for.

More to come.

Read more here.

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