The Centrelink computer which pays out more than $150 billion a year is like a 'Commodore 64'

The Centrelink computer system which dishes out more than $150 billion a year in benefits has been described as being so old it’s like a “turbo charged Commodore 64”.

News.com.au reported the department’s Income Security Integrated System, which would cost at least $1 billion to replace, is so outdated it’s finding it difficult to recruit staff who can work on it.

“In 1983 the system ­delivered $10 billion worth of payments to around 2.5 million people; it now makes more than $100 billion in payments to 7.3 million people,” Human Services Minister Marise Payne said.

Instead of overhauling the system, over the years governments have just tweaked it.

“To put it simply, we are running a turbocharged Commodore 64 with a spoiler in the age of the iPhone,” she said.

There’s more here.

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