The Most Brutal Recent Throwdowns On Financial TV

jim cramer

Photo: CNBC

One of the reasons we love having CNBC and Bloomberg TV on all day are the personalities on the financial news channels.Everyone comes from different backgrounds and have very different opinions on the markets, certain stocks and the biggest players in the financial industry. And they aren’t afraid to voice it.

Get ready to be shocked as you watch people get burned and kicked around. It’s pretty awesome.

It started with a disagreement over where the priorities lay for big banks: Cohan said bank employees only want to satisfy their own greed without a care for investors. Ruhle maintained that it's the opposite.

The two started arguing and bringing up their own careers on Wall Street (Cohan worked at Lazard, Ruhle worked at Deutsche Bank).

Finally, Cohan shot at Ruhle: 'You would've been happy to stay at Deutsche Bank if you'd gotten paid half of what you got.'

Jim Cramer goes nuts over how he was treated after recommending Bear Stearns as a buy as he and Simon Hobbs argue about the Euro crisis

CNBC anchors Jim Cramer and Simon Hobbs were already in the middle of a heated argument about whether the Eurozone would have a 'Lehman moment.'

The argument gets out of control when Cramer starts flipping out about how he needs to acknowledge that a 'Lehman moment' is possible or else he would be 'crucified' like when he told people to buy Bear Stearns before the bank was bought up in near-bankruptcy by JP Morgan.

Hobbs was unsympathetic, shooting back, 'YOU told people to buy Bear Stearns!'

Warren Buffett burns Joe Kernen with a joke about sleeping with his wife

Buffett appeared on CNBC last month and gave the following analogy to how he looks at buying companies: 'When a girl hangs up on me once I try again.'

'Well when you call back and her husband answers normally that puts a damper on things, eh Warren?' Kernen immediately shot back, referring to Buffett's recent comment that he was more likely to be killed by a jealous husband than prostate cancer.

Without missing a beat, Buffett replied 'It's certainly been tough when I call your house.'

Newt Gringrich disses journalists after CNBC's Maria Bartiromo asks him what the media was getting wrong about the economy

At a debate of Republican presidential candidates hosted by CNBC last November, Newt Gingrich shone as he smoothly answered a question about how corporations helped the American economy, then threw a last minute diss to journalists by saying they were covering the economy completely wrong. Well, CNBC's Money Honey Maria Bartiromo did not let that sit.

She shot back--'What is the media reporting inaccurately about the economy?' to an embarrassing round of laughter from the candidates and the audience.

Gingrinch smoothly replied: 'I love humour disguised as a question. That's terrific.'

Ouch.

CNBC's Carl Quintanilla and Michael Moore go at it over Occupy Wall Street

This one started off hostile. Moore starts off by pointing out that the NYSE never lets him inside the building to be interviewed with CNBC, and that they moved him away from the building for this particular interview.

The two then starts going off on Occupy Wall Street, with Quintanilla asking some very passive-aggressive questions and Moore coming back with equally acerbic replies.

Carl Icahn and Lionsgate vice-chair Michael Burns sling mud at each other as CNBC's Melissa Lee plays referee

Back when Carl Icahn attempted a hostile takeover of movie studio Lionsgate in 2010, CNBC's Fast Money somehow got Icahn and Lionsgate's vice-chair on the phone together!

Cue: cat-fight. (The real yelling starts around 7:00)

CNBC's Melissa Lee was also quite a harsh referee and got her own yelling in there. This is quality television.

CEO of a construction company flails and stutters after hardball questions from Jim Cramer

Just watching this was embarrassing for us. After several analysts questioned Hovnanian Enterprises future revenue and stock price growth due to decrease in housing starts, the company's CEO Ara Hovnanian appeared on CNBC to face a round of grilling from Jim Cramer.

It's safe to say, he didn't pass and stuttered through just the first answer to hardball questions from Cramer, and then suddenly said he had 'bad audio' and couldn't hear them.

Then, he s. From the look that Cramer and Melissa Lee gave each other, it looks like they didn't believe the 'bad audio' excuse one bit.

CNBC's famous ranter Rick Santelli gave bank analyst Meredith Whitney a piece of his mind when she made a comment about the Tea party that he didn't see eye-to-eye with. Whitney said the Tea party was mainly powered by unemployment, saying they were 'freaked out white men who are unemployed' and who are about to roll off their employment benefits.

'The last person that said that was King George about the colonists, that's all I'm going to say,' Santelli said. Then, not willing to let it go, he shot at Whitney: 'How many muni areas have actually defaulted?' likely referring to Whitney's disastrous call that 2011 was going to be the year of muni defaults (the interview was in August 2011).

Santelli added sarcastically after, 'stick with munis' to a puzzled and shocked Whitney who didn't understand why he was so angry.

Charlie Gasparino and Dennis Kneale fight to talk over one another over their opinions on Citigroup

Former CNBC reporters Charlie Gasparino and Dennis Kneale had a big argument over whether Vikram Pandit should stay at Citigroup back in 2009 as the two struggled to be heard of the other's louder voice.

'Charlie, you know that phrase you use, 'Let me finish?' You know that part?' Kneale said.

We'll let you watch the rest--

BONUS: Jon Stewart destroys Jim Cramer over recommending Bear Stearns as a buy, kicks CNBC in the process

We're all familiar with Jon Stewart, so the video will speak for itself (note that this happened back in 2009)--

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