The 10 most important things in the world right now

GreeceREUTERS/Kostas TsironisGreek Presidential guards march at the monument of the unknown soldier in front of the Parliament building during a ceremonial change of guards in Athens February 8, 2015.

Good morning! Here’s what you need to know for Tuesday.

1. Greece’s radical government will ask for a “bridge” agreement until a wider debt deal can be negotiated in September when it meets with eurozone partners on Wednesday.

2. A senior government official says the mysterious death of Argentine prosecutor Alberto Nisman is part of an
attempted coup d’etat to get rid of President Cristina Fernandez.

3.
Polish Defence Minister Tomasz Siemoniak said supplying arms to Ukraine is a last resort as it could escalate the conflict in the region.

4. Greek Defence Minister Panos Kammenos said the government could get funding from other countries, including the United States and China, if it failed to get a new deal with the eurozone.

5. Russian President Vladimir Putin is in Egypt to meet with President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi.

6. UBS confirmed that it is being investigated by US regulators for helping rich Americans evade taxes, which comes only a day after HSBC admitted to similar allegations.

7. British prime minister David Cameron will tell business leaders that the best way to undermine the Labour party is to give workers a pay raise.

8. The last surviving officer from a battleship that was bombed in the 1941 attack on Pear Harbour has died at the age of 100.

9. The measles outbreak in California is growing, with a total of 107 cases now confirmed.

10. A new survey found that Japanese high school girls spend an average of seven hours a day on their mobile phones.

And finally …

Google has an insane dog robot that can run really fast.

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