The 10 most important things in the world right now

BikesREUTERS/Bernadett SzaboThousands of cyclists hold up their bicycles after riding around the Hungarian capital Budapest on April 25, 2015, to demonstrate critical mass and demand that the city, where hundreds of thousands of people regularly use bikes to get around, develop more cycling infrastructure.

Hello! Here’s what you need to know for Monday.

1. The death toll from Nepal’s worst earthquake in 81 years, which struck on Saturday, has now climbed above 3,200.

2. A new video from Mount Everest shows what a deadly avalanche triggered by Saturday’s earthquake looked like from base camp.

3.Russian President Vladimir Putin said in an interview broadcast Sunday that he doesn’t “regret a thing” over his annexation of Crimea from Ukraine last March, calling it an “element of historical justice.”

4. An Israeli air strike on the Syrian border killed four Islamic militants who were planting an explosive.

5. Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras and German Chancellor Angela Merkel agreed Sunday to maintain communication throughout Greece’s negotiations with its creditors as the country risks running out of cash within weeks.

6. Polls predict Kazakh President Nursultan Nazarbayev won his fifth consecutive term by a landslide Sunday with 97.5% of the vote, which will extend his 26-year rule.

7. Chile’s Calbuco volcano remains unstable and could erupt again after erupting twice in 24 hours last week.

8. Ceremonies in Germany, Croatia, and France on Sunday remembered the liberation of three Nazi-run concentration camps 70 years ago during WWII.

9. Serbia signed a $US3-billion (£1.9-billion) deal Sunday with an Abu Dhabi-based developer to transform an area of Belgrade into an upscale housing and shopping complex, a project that opponents have called a scam.

10.Apple reports earnings for the quarter that ended in March on Monday, with analysts expecting major revenue growth driven by strong iPhone sales.

And finally …

The New York Police Department thanked four Swedish law enforcement officers for breaking up a fight on the subway while vacationing in New York City.

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