Texas Longhorns: How The Richest School In College Sports Makes And Spends Its Millions

No university athletic department makes more money than the University of Texas.

Despite a basketball team that failed to make the NCAA tournament and a football team that has struggled in recent years, the athletic department took in $US163.3 million in revenue last year according to data collected by USAToday.com.

Piecing together information collected by USAToday.com as well as BusinessofCollegeSports.com and other sources, we can get a better sense of where all that money comes from and how the school spends it.

It is an eye-opening look into the world of big-time college sports and the millions it generates.

The football and men's basketball teams account for approximately 70% of the athletic department's revenue

Total athletic department revenue: $US163.3 million

Football team revenue*: $US95.7 million (59%)

Men's basketball team revenue*: $US16.4 million (10%)

* Based on 2011 data collected by the BusinessofCollegeSports. Was likely slightly greater in 2012.

More than one-third of the revenue comes from ticket sales

Total athletic department revenue: $US163.3 million

Ticket sales: $US59.2 million (36%)

The Texas football team had six home games in 2012 (most other big schools have 7-8) and sold 605,304 tickets acording to the NCAA. The average attendance of 100,884 was fourth among all FBS (Division I) schools. The men's basketball team had 16 home games and sold 175,116 tickets, averaging 10,945 per game.

One-third of the revenue comes from television contracts and other licensing deals

Total athletic department revenue: $US163.3 million

Rights and licensing deals: $US53.9 million (33%)

A large chunk of this revenue comes from television broadcast rights. Texas has an exclusive deal with The Longhorn Network and ESPN that pays the school $15 million per year over 20 years. In addition, the school also takes in another $US6 million from the Big 12 conference's contract with ESPN and $US8.5 million from the conference's deal with Fox Sports.

Another $US3.5 million comes from the school's deal with Nike

Total athletic department revenue: $US163.3 million

Contract with Nike: The deal covers all varsity sports and is for seven years and is worth a total of $US45 million

This year, Nike will pay the athletic department $US1 million and will provide $US2.5 million worth of equipment.

One-fourth of all revenue is donated to the athletic department

Total athletic department revenue: $US163.3 million

Contributions: $US40.7 million (25%)

The Longhorns football team plays at Darrell K Royal - Texas Memorial Stadium, in honour of their former coach. But the field's name is actually Joe Jamail Field. In fact, a number of campus buildings and facilities are named for the wealthy trial lawyer as a result of his large donations to the school. But he is just the biggest of many donors that support the athletic department.

The school also takes in another $US9.4 million in miscellaneous revenue

Total athletic department revenue: $US163.3 million

Other revenue: $US9.4 million (6%)

A big chunk of this would include the $US3 million the football team received for playing in the Alamo Bowl as well as a share of the money generated by the Big 12 in the BCS and other bowls.

When compared to the amount of revenue generated, the football and men's basketball teams spend very little

Total athletic department expenses: $US138.3 million

Football team expenses*: $US24.5 million (18%)

Men's basketball team expenses*: $US8.2 million (6%)

It's clear the the football and men's basketball teams support the rest of the athletic department. Those two teams combine for approximately 70% of the revenue but only 24% of the expenses. The other 16 varsity sports represent up to 30% of the revenue and 76% of the expenses. However, some of the other revenue and expenses are likely to be non-sport-specific.

* Based on 2011 data collected by the BusinessofCollegeSports. Was likely slightly greater in 2012.

One-third of all revenue is spent on the salaries of coaches and their staffs

Total athletic department revenue: $US163.3 million

Coaches and staff salaries: $US53.5 million (33%)

The biggest chunk of this goes to football coach Mack Brown and his assistant coaches. Brown's salary alone ($5.3 million) represents 3.8% of the athletic department's total expenses. In addition, assistant coaches in 2010-11 made approximately $US4 million.

But less than 6% of all revenue is spent on scholarships

Total athletic department revenue: $US163.3 million

Scholarships: $US9.4 million (5.7%)

As you can see in the chart, the gap between what the school is making and what they are giving to the athletes is growing.

More than $US24 million was spent on infrastructure.

Total athletic department revenue: $US163.3 million

Buildings: $US24.0 million (14.7%)

Large public universities have to find some place to spend the millions they make and one of the grand beneficiaries is the constant improvements to stadiums and facilities.

The school also spends another $US51.4 million in miscellaneous expenses including recruiting, travel, and gameday expenses.

Total athletic department expenses: $US138.3 million

Miscellaneous expenses: $US51.4 million

The biggest expenses listed under 'other' would include things like recruiting, travel, equipment, and the overall cost of having a home game. For example, in 2010-11, the football team spent $US578,000 on recruiting, $US1.4 million on travel, $US247,000 on equipment, and $US4.7 million on gameday expenses. Oh, and it probably costs a few dollars to feed and take care of Bevo, their mascot.

The athletic department had a 'profit' of $US25.0 million.

Total athletic department revenue: $US163.3 million

Total athletic department expenses: $US138.3 million

Difference: $US25.0 million

It's unclear where this extra money went, but as a public school it had to go somewhere, possibly to other departments within the school.

Now let's look back and see how much other schools make compared to Texas

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