Tesla's new car is locking out owners

The Tesla Model X is equipped with such advanced technological features that CEO Elon Musk has said it “may be the hardest car to build in the world.” But for such a technologically savvy car, owners are finding it difficult to open their doors.

The Wall Street Journal reported Wednesday that the doors were failing for many Model X owners. Anne Carter, a Model X owner, told the WSJ that the doors failed when she was trying to drive a carpool of kids to school. Another Model X owner Brad Ledwith told the outlet that his doors gave out just a few days after receiving the car.

“It’s a bummer; you spent all this money…and the doors won’t open,” Carter told the WSJ.

Byron Deeter, another Model X owner based in California, tweeted that the door and passenger windows of his car won’t close.

The falcon wing doors are a major design feature of the Model X that was touted during the car’s unveiling.

The problem stems back to manufacturing issues with the Model X, which should come as no surprise considering the car’s troublesome history getting off the ground. 

The release of the Model X was delayed, the root cause of which was Tesla’s own “hubris in adding far too much new technology to the Model X in version 1,” the company said in its quarterly report. Tesla also issued a voluntary recall in early April for the Model X due to an issue that can cause the third-row seats to “flip” forward in the event of a crash.

Considering the Tesla Model X starts at $80,000, with signature models beginning at a pricey $132,000, the chronic issues are rubbing people the wrong way.

“I think to myself, I am willing to concede a couple of things, but it is just I’m leasing this car for $1,350 per month,” Ledwith told the WSJ. “If it is out two weeks, that costs $700.”

Tesla issued the following statement to Tech Crunch about the issue: 

While we have seen some issues with early Model X builds, the issues are not widespread, and we are working closely with each owner to respond quickly and proactively to address any problems. We will continue to do so until each customer is fully satisfied.

Tesla did not immediately respond to Tech Insider’s request for comment.

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