There are 2 parts to the big Tesla Model 3 debut this week

TeslaJoe Raedle/Getty ImagesThe front grille of a Tesla Model S, the Model 3’s soon-to-be big sister.

You may have heard that Tesla is about to introduce a major new vehicle to its lineup on Thursday — the entry-level Model 3.

Much of the automotive world has been buzzing about the electric-car company’s latest creation for one key reason — it’s the first Tesla priced low enough to be considered a mass-market vehicle.

Buyers can expect a base sticker of about $35,000 for the Model 3.

As is typical of Tesla CEO Elon Musk, he has shared more clues about what we can expect.

First, the global reveal at Tesla’s design headquarters in Southern California on Thursday will be the first of two events surrounding the Model 3.

In a tweet Wednesday afternoon, Musk said Thursday’s event “is Part 1 of the Model 3 unveil. Part 2, which takes things to another level, will be closer to production.”

Responding to a person who appeared baffled by the suspense, Musk followed up with another tweet:

“You will see the car very clearly, but some important elements will be added and some will evolve,” Musk said.

Last month, Musk tweeted that the price to wait in line for a Model 3 will be the same for everyone — $1,000 — and that preorders would begin globally on March 31.

And last week, Tesla shared an email with details about the Model 3’s rollout planned for late 2017. Deliveries will begin on the West Coast and then move east. Buyers who already own a Tesla will get their Model 3s first.

Business Insider will be at the Model 3 debut Thursday night. Check back for the latest details, photos and video from the event.

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