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Tesla is recalling 53,000 Model S and Model X cars globally over a parking brake problem

Tesla CEO Elon Musk. Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images.

Tesla is recalling 53,000 Model S and Model X cars globally over a fault with the electric parking brake.

The company announced the recall overnight in the US, issuing a statement that the problem involved a small gear from a third-party supplier.

Telsa said the fault had not caused any accidents or injuries, but means the parking brake may not release and thus stop the car from moving.

“In order to be overly cautious, we are going to be proactively replacing these parts to ensure that no issues arise,” the company said.

The recall affects Model S and Model X vehicles built between February and October 2016.

“There have been no reports of the parking brake system failing to hold a parked vehicle or failing to stop a vehicle in an emergency as a result of this condition, and this part has no impact on the car’s regular braking systems,” Tesla said.

“We have also determined that only a very small percentage of gears in vehicles built during this period were manufactured improperly.”

The company said it will be notifying affected owners by mail which will include information on how to have parking brakes replaced.

“In the meantime, it is safe to continue regular use of your vehicle,” Tesla said.

The latest recall follows a problem with the locking hinge on third-row seats in the Model X SUV, which saw 2,700 cars recalled in the US last year.

Tesla shares fell 1.3% on the news, but recovered slightly to be down just under 1% at $US302.51 when the market closed.

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