Tesla's Powerpack batteries may be used to support New York's energy grid

  • Tesla may team up with a subsidiary of Con Edison, the largest electric company in New York, to integrate its Powerpack batteries into New York power grids.
  • If the proposal is accepted by the New York State Public Service Commission, it could represent a big step forward for Tesla’s energy business.
  • The company has used its Powerpack batteries to supplement or replace elements of traditional power grids throughout the world.

Con Edison, the largest electric utility company in New York, may start to integrate Tesla Powerpack batteries into power grids controlled by Orange and Rockland Utilities, one of ConEd’s subsidiary companies.

Electrek first reported the proposal (Read the full proposal here), which was submitted to the New York State Public Service Commission on February 6. Under the proposal, Tesla would create, install, and operate 4MW/8MWh batteries that would be integrated into Orange and Rockland’s power grid. The proposal indicates that the project would be used to test the feasibility of using batteries on a wider scale in New York power grids after a three-year “demonstration period.”

If the proposal were accepted, it could represent a big step forward for Tesla’s energy business, which includes batteries and solar panels for residential and commercial use. The past few years Tesla has used its Powerpack batteries to supplement or replace elements of traditional power grids throughout the world, including in South Australia and Puerto Rico.

On the residential side, Tesla will set up designated spaces in over 800 Home Depot stores to highlight residential energy products like the Powerwall home battery, and the company is reportedly in talks to sell solar products in Lowe’s stores. Tesla has also begun to install its solar roof, which CEO Elon Musk has touted as an aesthetically-pleasing alternative to clunky, traditional solar panels, for customers who ordered them last year.

Orange and Rockland Utilities did not immediately respond to a request for comment. Tesla declined to comment.

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