10 Worst Newsletters Of 2008

Each year Peter Brimelow runs through the 10 worst and 10 best performing investment newsletters. This year’s market produced some surprising results, including the triumph of Arch Crawford’s Crawford Perspectives, which gained 42.4% in a year when the markets cratered. Crawford, a technically-oriented timer, famously uses astrology to assist his analysis. Hey, whatever works!

Among this year’s losers are some of thde oldest names that in the past have been amazing performers. Louis Navellier’s Emerging Growth letter was dashed upon the rocks of the global slow down. The gold bug letters were also smashed by the wild markets. At least a couple of last year’s best performers wound up on this year’s worst performing list.

You can read Brimelow’s full analysis here. For now, here’s his list of the 10 worst newsletters.

  1. BI Research -56.3%
  2. Louis Navellier’s Emerging Growth -57.6%
  3. Medical Technology Stock Letter -61.2%
  4. Oberweis Report -63.4%
  5. Linde Equity Report -63.6%
  6. Ruff Times -65.2%
  7. Dines Letter -72.1%
  8. Equities Special Situations -74.3%
  9. International Harry Schultz Letter -75.6%
  10. Charlie Buck’s Win Before You Buy -82.0%

Of course, many of the editors of these letters would point out that they have a longer term view than just the past year and so these one year metrics aren’t a fair measure of their accuracy. The gold bugs, in particular, probably are in for a great run now that every major central bank is dedicated to the proposition that money should be printed more rapidly.

Those of you in search of some good news should go check out the best performers, which Brimelow wrote about two weeks ago.

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