If you're an Amazon Prime member, you can now listen to all of Taylor Swift's albums for free without ads

Taylor Swift has finally squashed her long-running beef with Spotify and has made her whole music catalogue available on the streaming service, including her latest album “1989.”

But if you don’t have a premium account on Spotify, there are some annoying restrictions on the way you can listen — on mobile you can only listen on shuffle and with ads.

If you have an Amazon Prime account, however, there’s an easy way to listen to ad-free, on-demand Taylor Swift you might not be aware of.

One of the many benefits of having a Prime account is that you get access to Prime Music, an app that’s more or less like Spotify and Apple Music, but has a smaller catalogue. This is not to be confused with Amazon Music Unlimited, which is Amazon’s full-fledged competitor to the on-demand giants.

So if you are a Prime member, and you want to jam out to ad-free Taylor Swift on your phone, you’re in luck. The whole catalogue is available on Prime Music (though presumably any new Swift album to come out won’t be immediately available there). The only caveat is that the “deluxe” versions of her albums are only on Amazon Music Music Unlimited. But the “standard version” of her whole catalogue is there, and you can even download it for offline listening.

And while you’re there, it’s worth checking out the catalogue on Prime Music. My former colleague Jillian D’Onfro wrote a great post in 2015 about why she loved Prime Music. If you don’t want to shell out $US10 a month for one of the premium services, it can be a useful tool and a nice perk if you’re already an Amazon Prime member.

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