The Taliban reportedly agreed with the US to not make Afghanistan a safe haven for exporting terrorism, even as it continues to terrorize Afghans

  • During the fourth day of peace talks between Taliban leaders and US diplomats, the insurgent group has reportedly made major concessions to the US.
  • A source familiar with the talks told the Wall Street Journal that Taliban leadership has agreed to oppose militant groups using Afghanistan to stage terrorist attacks outside the country.
  • Although the Taliban has fought against ISIS, the concession would mean they would also oppose any plans formed by al-Qaeda.
  • Because Taliban militants still revere former al-Qaeda leader Osama Bin Laden, their leaders have previously refused to oppose the group.
  • The concessions could be a major step forward for the peace talks, which aim to end the US’s 17-year war in Afghanistan.

The Taliban has reportedly made a major concession to the US during their peace talks in Afghanistan, according to the Wall Street Journal.

As US diplomatic officials and leaders of the insurgent group discuss the end of the 17-year war in Afghanistan, one source familiar with the talks told the Journal that the Taliban has agreed to oppose “any attempts by militant groups to use Afghanistan to stage terrorist attacks abroad.”

The concessions, if finalised, would seem to support an eventual US withdrawal on the grounds that Afghanistan, even under the Taliban, would not become a safe haven for terrorists to train and launch attacks outside the country. The Taliban continues to use brutal tactics against civilians and coalition forces, including suicide bombings and improvised explosive devices to gain control of more of the country against the faltering government.

US negotiators, now in their fourth day of talks in Doha, Qatar, have sought assurance that the Taliban would not support militant groups like al-Qaeda and ISIS.

Sources familiar with the talks have told the Journal that that was previously a promise the Taliban was not willing to make due to the group’s relationship with al-Qaeda.

The group formerly led by Osama bin Laden formed in Pakistan but was able to establish roots in Afghanistan in the 90s. After the terror attacks on 9/11, Taliban leader Mullah Mohammad Omar refused to acknowledge Bin Laden’s role in the attacks or cooperate with US authorities, according to the Journal.

Although he would later acknowledge al-Qaeda’s responsibility, Taliban militants, who are still carrying out attacks on Afghan forces and coalition partners, hold Bin Laden in high regard. Because of this, leaders of the insurgency have previously refused to take steps to oppose al-Qaeda, sources told the Journal.

Their stance appears to have softened, as Taliban leadership has now reportedly agreed to oppose militant groups in Afghanistan; sources also told the Journal the leaders are no longer demanding an immediate and complete withdrawal of US forces, which American officials have argued might lead to civil war.

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