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Sydney home-cooked meal startup Dishme has just raised $25,000 from one of its first users

Dishme meals. Image: Supplied

Dishme, a Sydney startup which connects home cooks with those who haven’t the time to create healthy meals, has just raised $25,000 from one of its first users.

The startup, one of this year’s batch on the H2 Ventures accelerator program, aims to capitalise on time poor inner city workers who want healthy food.

Dishme is currently operating within 5 kms of Sydney’s CBD and has 300 cooks registered.

“We are an Uber for personal cooks,” says founder and CEO Pushpinder Bagga.

The investment of $25,000 for 2.5% of the company came from a family of four, a couple with two young children, early adopters looking for health food.

The stake values the business at $1 million.

They first paid $79 for four meals, cooked by a personal chef, delivered to the door.

“She (the mother) was extremely happy that her family was eating all the meals,” says Bagga.

DishMe takes 30% of each meal price. The chef gets about 50% after ingredient costs.

Some of the most popular chefs are doing around eight deliveries a day.

New chefs are interviewed at their home kitchen by Dishme. Then they need food handling certification.

Bagga says Australia has 500,000 stay at home parents who are fantastic family cooks.

He was living in Adelaide and had health problems when he came up with the idea for Dishme.

“I only knew how to cook scrambled eggs and boiled rice,” he told Business Insider. “I was working 18 hours a day.”

He then found people who were willing to cook for him and use the types of ingredients he wanted.

In January 2016, he counted 516 people on online classified advert site Gumtree offering to cook for other people, and 3000-plus selling food.

“There are extremely busy urbanites wanting good food but are unable to cook,” he says.

Dishme home cook Nichole Ferro. Image: Supplied

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