Sydney Airport's Kerrie Mather is going

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Kerrie Mather has decided to retire after six years as the CEO of Sydney Airport.

An international recruitment firm has been appointed to do a global search for a replacement.

The former investment banker has been the chief executive of Sydney Airport since June 2011.

Sydney Airport chairman Trevor Gerber said: “Under Kerrie’s leadership, Sydney Airport has developed strong and enduring relationships across the aviation industry, with all levels of government both in Australia and internationally, and with our local communities.”

He says the airport is well placed for future growth as Australia’s premier international gateway.

Mather says she’s enjoyed every single day at Sydney Airport.

“Aviation is one of the most dynamic and exciting industries in the world,” she says.

“It’s changing rapidly, led by constantly evolving technological advancement and customer needs. Sydney Airport has responded to those changes and opportunities with a focus not only on our airline partnerships and their customers, but also on the wider community.”

Mather will remain in her role until a new CEO is appointed.

Sydney Airport in 2016 posted revenue of $1.36 billion, an increase of 11% on the previous year. Profit was $244.8 million, a rise of 0.7%.

A key decision for the airport is whether or not to be involved in a planned new airport at Badgerys Creek.

The population in western Sydney is expected to grow from 2 million to 3 million by the 2030s. Sydney’s main airport is expected to reach capacity by 2027.

The 2002 Sydney (Kingsford Smith) Airport Sale Agreement gives Sydney Airport a right of first refusal to develop and operate a second major airport within 100km of Sydney’s CBD.

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