A domesticated dog with powerful wolf jaws has been unearthed at a Stone Age dig in Sweden

Johan Nilsson/TT News Agency/AFP via Getty ImagesThe skeleton of an 8,400-year-old dog is pictured in Blekinge Museum’s object magazine in Karlskrona, Sweden on November 24, 2020.
  • The 8,400-year-old remains of a dog that lived alongside humans have been found buried in Sweden.
  • The Stone Age dog was discovered in Sölvesborg, Blekinge County about 350 miles south of the capital, Stockholm.
  • The dog is currently being kept at the Blekinge Museum but it has not yet been decided where it will be exhibited.
  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

A vanished breed of domesticated dog has been unearthed at a dig of a Stone Age culture in Scandinavia.

The Stone Age dog was discovered by archaeologists in Sölvesborg, Blekinge County about 350 miles south of the capital, Stockholm.

Ola Magnell, a Zooarchaeologist at National Historical Museums, Sweden, told Insider: “Since these dog burials are rare and the bones are very fragile I spent three days carefully exposing the skeleton.”

8,400-year-old dogJohan Nilsson/TT News Agency/AFP via Getty ImagesZooarchaeologist, Ola Magnell, is pictured in Blekinge Museum’s object magazine brushing sand from the dog’s skeleton in Karlskrona, Sweden on November 24, 2020.

Magnell added: “A few bones were found in a pit and I could see that it was several bones from one animal. First, I could identify a carpal bone from the front paw and later the mandible was exposed so I could confirm that this was definitely a complete dog.”

Arctic wolf in the autumnDaniel Parent/GettyAn arctic wolf in the autumn.

He said that while the dog’s breed no longer exists, it could be compared to ” a Spitz, a dog like a Siberian husky, but with jaws powerful as a wolf.”

The dog is currently being kept at the Blekinge Museum but it has not yet been decided where it will be exhibited.

It was found in the Ljungaviken neighbourhood of Sölvesborg which would have been a coastal area until rising sea levels covered it with gyttja and preserved it for years, the Daily Mail reported.

The remains of a dog that lived alongside humans, believed to between 14,000 and 20,000 years old, were discovered in Italy, earlier this year.

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