This App Will Make The Weather Look Beautiful On Your iPhone Or iPad

sun app main

Apple’s weather app is fine for the basics, but it isn’t necessarily beautiful or groundbreaking.

We discovered this new web app called Sun today via 9-to-5Mac.

The app is extremely simple, easy to use, and best of all it takes advantage os some unique gestures.

Although it’s a web app, Sun will only work on iPhones and iPads.

Check out our screenshot tour of Sun below.

We'll go over the iPad first. Head to safari and type in the address bar: pattern.dk/sun/

You'll know you're at the site because you will see the sun. We need to add it to the home screen so tap the arrow next to the address bar and select 'Add To Home Screen.' Then hit Add.

The web app will then be added to your home screen. Tap to open.

To provide you with the most accurate weather you need to allow the app to use your location.

The app is very simple, but has some cool multi-touch options.

Pinch in to show options. Add your favourite cities.

There are also several themes for you to choose from.

The different colours are pretty cool.

Here is the theme we settled on.

If you swipe the app has a cool 3D effect.

You can also get Sun on your iPhone. Head to the same site: pattern.dk/sun/

Click the arrow directly in the bottom middle.

Select Add to Home Screen.

Name it whatever you like and click Add.

Tap to open.

Say OK to location services.

The app functions pretty similarly on the iPhone.

Make sure to switch to Fahrenheit if you're in the US.

Pull your fingers apart to reveal the four day forecast.

You can easily view the 4 day forecast.

And the iPhone app also has a pretty cool 3D effect.

Just swipe to activate.

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