Turns out hedge fund billionaire Steve Cohen DID really have a large pig living in his Connecticut mansion

Tattooed Pigs by Wim DelvoyeAP ImagesNot Steve Cohen’s pig.

A couple years ago, we reported a rumour based on a source who claims to have seen it that billionaire hedge fund manager Steven Cohen had a live and very large pig living in his 35,000 square-foot Connecticut mansion.

Page Six is now reporting that he did in fact have a large domesticated swine living in his home named Romeo.

The Cohens reportedly took in Romeo as a piglet. The pig even had its own room in the mansion.

Romeo apparently grew too big and they had to find him a new home. According to the New York Post, he’s been sent to live on a vegan farm in Florida (phew!).

Our source claimed that Romeo had a tattoo on his face and that he appeared to be a walking piece of art. That’s not entirely clear.

Cohen is a huge art collector, though. His expansive collection includes pieces by Monet, Picasso, Jasper Johns, Jeff Koons, Damien Hirst, Willem de Kooning, Francis Bacon and Andy Warhol, according to a 2010 Vanity Fair profile. He recently purchased Alberto Giacometti’s 1947 masterpiece “Man Pointing” for $US141.3 million at Christie’s.

Cohen is the founder of SAC Capital, which is now called Point72 Asset Management after SAC pleaded guilty to insider trading charges in November 2013 and agreed to pay a $US1.8 billion settlement. Point72 Asset Management currently operates as a “family office” hedge fund that manages Cohen’s wealth and money of its employees, which comes to about $US11 billion in assets.

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