Spotify Is Launching Family Subscriptions So You Won't Get Kicked Out When Someone Else Tries To Use Your Account

The Rolling Stones and guests perform at Glastonbury Festival 2013. Photo Matt Cardy/Getty

For users which share their Spotify account, the music streaming service has just launched a family product so up to four additional users can share one billing account whilst keeping your listening history completely separate, which means Norah Jones or the Frozen soundtrack won’t pop up when you’re listing to your fave Rolling Stones album.

Recommendations and playlists are completely separate, there’s no ads and the more users you add the cheaper it gets.

A family of five pays $AU35.99 a month and there are no more interruptions when someone else logs in and starts playing.

“This is one of the most asked for features from our audience,” Spotify chief content officer Ken Parks said.

Here’s how much it will cost in Australia.

  • 2 users – $17.99
  • 3 users – $23.99
  • 4 users – $29.99
  • 5 users – $35.99

Launching in Australia in 2012, Spotify has grown from a user-base of early adopters and a core demographic of 18 to 35 year olds in the past two-and-a-half years.

“We’re noticing strong growth in the 13-18, and 35+ categories especially,” Spotify Australia MD Kate Vale said.

It’s that trend which drove the launch of its new family subscription service.

“It’s very common for whole households to be using Spotify to power their music – a family plan is one of our most requested features, and we know that a lot of families are currently stuck with the hassle of sharing accounts,” Vale said.

“We think that a lot of these users would prefer to have their own account, with their own music, if it was available to them at an affordable price.”

Spotify has also announced a partnership with Vodafone this month as it looks to round up more subscribers from the telco’s 5 million strong customer base and tap into its retail shopfronts.

“Our hope is to emulate, if not exceed, the success of the partnership between Spotify and Vodafone UK, which has contributed significantly to Spotify’s subscription revenues soaring in 2013/2014 – this in turn means even more contributions to the music industry, and hopefully, a continuing downward trend in music piracy,” Vale said.

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