Socially distanced attractions and activities for a road trip across the Northeast that are actually worth the stop

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A skywalk at Kinzua Bridge State Park in Pennsylvania. zrfphoto/Getty Images


Summer 2020 is full of travel restrictions to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, and travel experts previously told Business Insider that they expect to see vacation trends shift from travelling by plane to that by car and RV.

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Sources: Business Insider, Business Insider


Here are the top-rated attractions across the Northeast that are worth a socially distanced visit.

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Maine: On the coast of Maine just north of Portland, catch a sunrise while walking through a rocky beach.

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Source: Trip Advisor, Harpswell, Maine


The Giant’s Stairs trail is a path in Harpswell, Maine, that follows the town’s rocky coastline. Trip Advisor reviews say that the scene is even more beautiful in real life than it is in photos.

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Source: Trip Advisor, Harpswell, Maine


A coronavirus update on the town’s website asks visitors to refer to social distancing guidelines set by the state and CDC. If the parking lot is full, that probably means that social distancing won’t be possible and you should come back another time, the website says.

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Source: Harpswell, Maine


New Hampshire: Just south of Maine, drive up a mountain into the clouds for another breathtaking view.

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Source: Trip Advisor, Mt. Washington Auto Road


It costs $US35 to drive your vehicle about eight miles up Mount Washington to the highest peak in the Northeast. For additional passengers, it costs $US10 per adult and $US7 per child.

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Source: Trip Advisor, Mt. Washington Auto Road


The road reopened on June 11 with measures in place to prevent the spread of coronavirus — all employees have to wear face masks and get their temperatures checked, visitors are encouraged to mask up too.

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Source: Mount Washington Auto Road


The auto road also has a guided tour option where patrons hop in a van and hear about the mountain’s history as they ride up it for between $US20 and $US40 a person, depending on their age.

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Amid the pandemic, the vans are only holding six of 12 potential passengers at a time and keeping the windows down whenever possible. Passengers have to wear a mask inside the vehicle.

Source: Mount Washington Auto Road


Vermont: On the west side of Vermont, next to Lake Champlain, watch films on the big screen from the comfort and safety of your car.

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Sources: Trip Advisor, Sunset Drive-In


With four big screens, Sunset Drive-In is an outdoor movie theatre that screens eight films a night — two on each screen, per the company’s website. Tickets cost $US12 for adults and $US7 for kids.

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Sources: Trip Advisor, Sunset Drive-In


The drive-in has new regulations to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, like cars must be 14 feet apart, and patrons have to wear masks at the snack bar.

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Source: Sunset Drive-In


Massachusetts: In Springfield, stretch your legs and take some photos with sculptures of the Grinch, the Lorax, and the Cat in the Hat.

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Source: Trip Advisor


Outside of the Amazing World of Dr. Seuss Museum, there are giant sculptures of Dr. Seuss’s characters that are free to view.

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Source: Trip Advisor


The sculptures are outdoors, making social distancing possible.

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Source: Trip Advisor


Rhode Island: In Providence, take a stroll through the city for views along the Woonasquatucket River.

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Source: Trip Advisor, City of Providence


Trip Advisor reviewers say this park is a nice place to take a walk and enjoy the views of the city.

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Source: Trip Advisor, City of Providence


Parks in Providence began to reopen after coronavirus closures on May 9. Visitors must wear face coverings and stay six feet away from other groups.

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Source: Trip Advisor, City of Providence


Connecticut: In Simsbury, stop to smell flowers on a bridge.

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Source: Trip Advisor


The Old Drake Hill Flower Bridge over the Farmington River is lined with potted flowers on both sides.

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Source: Trip Advisor


Although the bridge is partially covered, it’s outdoors, which helps with social distancing.

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Sources: Trip Advisor, Simsbury, Connecticut


New York: On the west side of Manhattan in New York City, walk across an old-train-line-turned-park for views of the city.

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Sources: Trip Advisor, The High Line


The High Line is elevated, giving patrons a closer look at surrounding skyscrapers in New York’s Chelsea neighbourhood. It’s free to enter too.

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Sources: Trip Advisor, The High Line


The High Line reopened from coronavirus closures on July 16, NPR reported. There are new social distancing guidelines in place, like having everyone walk in one direction and wear masks. Circles are placed six feet apart on the ground to remind visitors to social distance.

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Sources: Trip Advisor, The High Line, NPR


New Jersey: In Essex County, enjoy a picnic and a view of New York City.

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Source: Trip Advisor


Eagle Rock Reservation is a park in the Watchung Mountains that includes hiking trails, views of the NYC skyline, and a 9/11 memorial site.

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Source: Trip Advisor, Essex County Parks


During the coronavirus pandemic, patrons must social distance and wear face coverings, per the Essex County parks website.

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Source: Essex County Parks


Pennsylvania: In McKean County, take a walk 300 feet off the ground on a broken railroad track.

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Sources: Trip Advisor, Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources


Kinzua Bridge State Park is home to a railroad that was slashed by a tornado in 2003, according to Trip Advisor. Today, visitors can walk up the portion of the structure that is still standing.

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Sources: Trip Advisor, Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources


Guests have to social distance and wear face masks inside state park buildings, per a July 17 update from the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources.

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Sources: Trip Advisor, Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources