Check out these spooky photos of shot down US aircraft on display at Vietnam's military museum in Hanoi

The Vietnam Military History Museum in Hanoi is one of six national museums in the country.

Opened in 1959, the museum has thousands of military artifacts, everything ranging from small medals to large aircraft.

In fact, the museum even has several US aircraft, which were shot down in North Vietnam during the Vietnam War, according to the museum’s website.

The Vietnam War, which was fought from 1955 to 1975, killed about 58,200 US troops and as many as 2 million civilians. The US had military advisors in Vietnam in the 1950s, but didn’t officially send combat troops there until 1965.

The museum also has US military vehicles that were purportedly captured during the Vietnam War.

Check them out below.


Here’s the purported wreckage of a US B-52, which was possibly shot down by a surface-to-air-missile during Operation Linebacker II in 1972.

Read more about the operation and how the B-52 was shot down here.


Here’s another angle.

Z3144228/Wikimedia Commons

Read more about B-52s here.


Next to the B-52 appears to be a US M-48 Patton main battle tank.

Read more about M48s, which was named after US Gen. George S. Patton, here.


And what looks like an M113 armoured personnel carrier.

Z3144228/Wikimedia Commons

Read more about M113s here.


The museum also has what looks like an M114 155mm howitzer.

Read more about M114s here, and about the US military’s current 155mm howitzer, the M777, here.


And what looks like a Bell UH-1H Iroquois, or Huey, helicopter.

Vuong Tri Binh/Wikimedia Commons

Read more about Hueys here.


It also appears to have an M3 Half-track, which was an armoured personnel carrier.

calflier001/Wikimedia Commons

Read more about M3s here.


And what looks like an M107 self-propelled howitzer.

Wikimedia Commons

Read more about M107s here, and about the US military’s current self-propelled howitzer, the M109 Paladin,here.


And what appears to be two A-1 Skyraiders (lower left), which were attack aircraft that often provided close air support.

Vuong Tri Binh/Wikimedia Commons

Source:

US Air Force

The museum has many more US, and even Russian, platforms too. Check out their website here.

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