300 properties were removed from short stay platforms in Tasmania for not meeting state regulations

Hobart. Image: Getty
  • The Tasmanian Government released its latest report on short stay accommodation in the state.
  • It found that 309 properties were removed from short stay platforms because they did not comply with regulations.
  • The report looked at data from 5054 properties listed between January 1 2020 and March 31 2020.
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A new report from the Tasmanian government found 309 properties were removed from short stay platforms because they didn’t comply with regulations.

Under the Short Stay Accommodation Act 2019, booking platforms are required to collect and display certain information about the properties they have listed. This information must also be reported to the Director of Building Control each quarter.

The Act provides addresses and permit-related information to councils. “Prior to the Act, councils had no easily accessible information with which to determine compliance with short stay accommodation regulations in their area,” the government’s Short Stay Accommodation report said.

The government’s Short Stay Accommodation report used data from 5054 properties listed between January 1 2020 and March 31 2020. It found there were 433 fewer properties listed on short-stay platforms compared to the previous quarter. Plus, 309 properties that wanted to be listed were instead removed as they didn’t comply with government regulations.

“Tasmania’s Short Stay Accommodation sector continues to play an important role in our economy and the Government’s nation-leading legislation is ensuring everyone is playing by the rules,” Tasmania’s Minister for Housing Roger Jaensch said in a statement.

Most of the properties listed in Greater Hobart were people opening up their own home. Of the 2070 properties recorded in that region, 1241 – or 60% – are the primary place of residence. That’s compared to 829 properties being second homes like an investment property.

However, tourist hotspots like Break O’Day municipality have only 20% of short stay listings as the primary place of residence – meaning more investment properties or holiday homes are being used instead.


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