Four Geographically Inaccurate Travel And Adventure Movies

indiana jones

We’ve taken a look at historical spots from the movies, but what about when filmmakers get it completely wrong?

In travel, adventure or escapade films, directors are often compelled to capture the most scenic or photogenic spots in a particular city – even if it comes at the cost of logic or even accuracy.

Whether they totally misrepresent, invent, or goof up the locations where scenes, some favourite movies can make people familiar with a particular destination laugh at the misinformation that’s portrayed on screen.

Here are some examples of gaping errors from films, in terms of geography or location-specific details.

Click here to see what movies got it wrong >
This post originally appeared at AOL Travel.

This 1990 chase film stars Goldie Hawn and Mel Gibson on the run in the Detroit-Wisconsin area, and features more than a few geographical and destination-specific mistakes.

According to IMDB, 'Rick and Marianne take a ferry boat clearly labelled 'DETROIT-RACINE FERRY.' Detroit is on the east side of Michigan. Racine, Wisconsin is across Lake Michigan on the west side of Michigan. Such a ferry would have to take a 2-3 day voyage around the entirety of Michigan.'

Pay close attention to the official trailer below, and you'll spot the errors.

In the movie's opening, Indiana Jones narrowly escapes death (as usual) in an altercation with a Shanghai nightclub owner. To get the heck out of Dodge, he boards a plane and books it out of Shanghai.

A map depicting his flight path has Indy flying southwest towards the city of Chongking. A depiction of the scenery below shows the plane travelling over the Great Wall of China.

While that might make for good cinematography, it's incorrect geography. In reality, the Great Wall of China is in the northern part of the country, closer to Mongolia and hundreds of miles away from Jones' flight path.

Read about non-bank breaking Memorial Day getaways on AOL Travel

Before Colin Firth won an Oscar for the 'King's Speech', he played another, fictitious British royal in the teeny bopper comedy 'What a Girl Wants.'

Firth played a fictitious royal who somehow resided in an enormous country estate in the centre of London. (Catch a glimpse in the trailer below.)

The positioning is beyond geographically incorrect, along with a few of the 'swinging London' montages.

For instance, according to IMDB, when heroine Daphine hops the number 8 bus in London it says 'Trafalgar Square,' though the real 8 bus stops nowhere near there.

Read about Spaceport America Tours on AOL Travel >

In the beginning of the film the villain character, Dennis Nedry, is seen completing a nefarious transaction involving dinosaur embryos at a cafe in what is purported to be San Jose, Costa Rica.

However, the city of San Jose is enormous -- not a rural village as it's depicted in the scene.

Most importantly, San Jose is located in the interior of the country -- but the filmmakers set the restaurant on a beach with palm trees.

Check out 15 Great Hotels for History Lovers on AOL Travel

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