Samsung's next smartphone may include a feature similar to the iPhone's 3D Touch

Apple event iPhone 6S 3D TouchApple3D Touch was one of the biggest changes to the iPhone 6s.

A new rumour out of China suggests that the next Galaxy smartphone will come with 3D touch.

The introduction of 3D Touch was arguably one of the biggest differences between the iPhone 6 and 6s. It lets users peak into things like messages, emails, Instagram photos, songs and news articles by pressing deeper into the iPhone’s screen.

The report comes from a Weibo user called I ICE Universe, a prolific leaker who claims that Samsung won’t be using the exact same technology found in the iPhone 6s, or even developing its own version in house.

Instead, the company is looking to partner with a company called Synaptics, which launched its own pressure-sensitive touchscreen sensors called Clearforce earlier this month. Synaptics says that its new technology will be ready in early 2016.

Still, this is only a rumour. A few details of Samsung’s next smartphone leaked just a day after Apple unveiled the iPhone 6s and 6s Plus, without any mention of 3D touch. The new phone, codenamed “Project Lucky,” appeared on Geekbench, a site that measures the performance of computer hardware and software and assigns it a numerical ranking.

The benchmark revealed the specs of the Galaxy S7 — or at least the specs of the device Samsung was testing at the time — includes a new 20-megapixel camera, a more powerful Exynos 8890 processor, and faster flash storage called “UFS 2.0.”

But considering that the Samsung Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge were released in April it’s unlikely that the S7 will be seen before early 2016.

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