Even More Evidence That Samsung's Next Galaxy Phone Will Be Insanely Powerful

J.K. Shin Samsung mobile CEO unveils galaxy s4REUTERS/Adrees LatifJK Shin, Samsung Mobile CEO.

One of Samsung’s biggest advantages in the smartphone wars is that it makes many of its own internal components like displays and processors.

Its latest weapon is a zippy new mobile memory chip it announced yesterday, and there’s a very good chance this will be the one used in Samsung’s next flagship phone, the Galaxy S5.

Here’s how Samsung describes what the new chip can do:

With the new chip, Samsung will focus on the premium mobile market including large screen UHD smartphones, tablets and ultra-slim notebooks that offer four times the resolution of full-HD imaging, and also on high-performance network systems.

In plain English, that means it’s fast enough to power very sharp high-definition screens that Samsung calls Ultra HD (or UHD). And that falls in line with some early rumours about the Galaxy S5 that say the phone will have a UHD screen. The chip has a whopping 4 GB of RAM, which would make it the first for a mobile device.

Other early rumours say the Galaxy S5 will have a sensor that can scan your eyes to unlock the phone without a passcode. It may also have a fingerprint sensor, sort of like the one on Apple’s iPhone 5S.

The new chip will also be a chance for Samsung to make a phone that’s faster than the iPhone 5S. Apple’s latest chip, called the A7, is much faster than any other smartphone processor available in devices today. It smokes Samsung’s current flagship phone, the Galaxy S4.

Samsung says the new memory chip will be available in 2014. The company is expected to announce the Galaxy S5 within the first few months of the year.

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