Samsung's new Galaxy Note 5 isn't coming to the UK and people are freaking out

Samsung lee jae-youngPaul SakumaSamsung Electronics Co. Chief Operating Officer Lee Jae-yong arrives at the Allen and Company Sun Valley Conference.

Do you live in England and want to get your hands on Samsung’s giant new tablet/phone, the Galaxy Note 5? Well you can’t. Samsung has confirmed that it’s not launching it in the UK, Engadget reports.

Samsung launched two new phones at its unpacked event yesterday: The Galaxy S6 Edge+ and Galaxy Note 5. But only one is coming to the UK.

The Galaxy S6 Edge+ is the more standard smartphone, while the Galaxy Note 5 is larger, and includes a stylus:

Galaxy Note 5 S Pen stylus note takingAntonio Villas-Boas/Tech InsiderIf you live in the UK, you’ll have to book an air ticket to get one of these.

Samsung fans aren’t happy about the decision not to launch the phone over here, and have taken to Twitter to complain:

 

 

 

Clearly, Samsung has customers here. So why isn’t it launching the Galaxy Note 5 in England? Here’s what it told Business Insider in a statement:

The market availability of the Galaxy S6 edge+ and Galaxy Note 5 will vary according to consumer needs and the specific market situation. The Galaxy Note 5 will be introduced in the US and Asian markets in August and Samsung will look at further opportunities to launch Galaxy Note 5 in other markets.

With the launch of the original Galaxy Note series in 2011, we created a whole new category that set a new industry standard, which all others have followed. For our European customers, Samsung’s portfolio will be centred on the Galaxy S6 edge+ which we feel better caters to the market’s needs.

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