Russia wants to arm its troops with small drones that drop bombs because ISIS did it

U.S. Marine Corps/Lance Cpl. Scott JenkinsRussia wants to arm small drones with bombs, a tactic that ISIS fighters used against Russian troops in Syria. Here, U.S. Marine Corps 2nd Lt. Michael Francica, with Combat Logistics Battalion 8, Combat Logistics Regiment 2, 2nd Marine Logistics Group, pilots an InstantEye quadcopter during an operations check for Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory.
  • The Russian Ministry of Defence told news site Izvestia that it will supply troops with small drones that will eventually be able to drop bombs.
  • ISIS has attacked Russian forces with small, bomb-rigged drones in Syria last year. These drones and quadcopters are the kinds of things hobbyists buy, and ISIS turned “these very simple, unsophisticated devices into very deadly ones,” said Samuel Bendett, a researcher at the CNA Corporation, told INSIDER.
  • “They’re seeing what works best, and if it doesn’t work, they will discard it,” Bendett said.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Russia is planning to supply its troops with small-scale drones that can drop bombs, Russian news site Izvestia reported last week. The quadcopters outfitted with explosives are modelled after similar commercial drones rigged with explosive devices used by ISIS fighters in Syria.

“This is a very tactical [unmanned aerial vehicle], we’re talking about small UAV with a close range,” Samuel Bendett, a researcher at the CNA Corporation and a member of CNA’s Center for Autonomy and AI, and a fellow in Russia studies at the American Foreign Policy Council, told INSIDER.

“Downrange, they will probably be able to strap a couple of grenades or bombs” to the UAVs, Bendett said.

While the UAVs aren’t yet outfitted with weapons, Izvestia cited sources in the Ministry of Defence saying the upgrade is imminent, and Bendett told INSIDER via email “given the relative simplicity in turning them into strike drones so they can drop grenades or mortar rounds, I would say that can happen relatively quickly.”

The US has pioneered drones in military operations, and many of them are larger than piloted planes and carry a suite of surveillance sensors and missiles. The armed MQ-9 Reaper has a 66-foot-long wingspan that’s twice that of an F-16 fighter. In contrast, the kind of small drones favoured by remote-control hobbyists weren’t thought of as a weapon until their use by ISIS combatants.

“Suddenly ISIS does a 180 and turns these very simple, unsophisticated devices into very deadly ones,” he said. “So there was that realisation that anything and everything could be turned into a weapon and therefore the Russian military should look at the successful adoption of the systems that have proven successful.”

ISIS fighters used drones to terrifying effect against the US-led coalition, the attacks did not result in a “large number of deaths,” according to a report by West Point’s Combating Terrorism Center.

Read more:Russia’s new drone looks like a snowy owl, and it has a deadly purpose

Russian law enforcement agencies already use small drones, Bendett said. What’s new is Russia’s decision to weaponize them – and the Ministry of Defence announcement of the decision.

It’s unclear how large the drones will be, or how many Russia will utilise, although Bendett said they could number in the thousands.

“I don’t believe that very small weaponised drones pose a particularly dangerous threat simply because a drone that weighs 33 grams simply can’t carry much of a payload,” Jeff Ellis, a partner at Clyde & Co. in New York, told INSIDER via email.

“That being said, slightly larger drones can be used to target individuals or small groups and remain very difficult to detect and interdict,” he said.

The drones will need to be able to support secure communication and small-scale sensors before they are useful to the Russian military, Bendett said.

But anything that the military uses, Bendett noted, would eventually trickle down to Russia’s state security apparatus, including the FSB, but only for intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance efforts “for now.”

While the adoption of terrorist tactic by a state might seem ethically dubious, Bendett said that Russia has adopted other technologies used by extremist groups, like technicals – a pick-up truck that has a mounted machine guns.

Furthermore, Bendett said it’s important to note that the Russian military is thinking tactically. “For Russians it’s a very matter of fact thing right now,” he told INSIDER. “They’re seeing what works best, and if it doesn’t work, they will discard it.”

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