Amazon’s Ring has recalled 350,000 smart doorbells in the US after some of them caught fire

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Ring has recalled hundreds of thousands of their doorbell cameras after reports of them catching on fire. Ring
  • Amazon-owned Ring has recalled more than 350,000 smart doorbells in the US after reports of some them catching fire and causing damage.
  • Around 350,000 second-generation Ring doorbells sold in the US, and roughly 8,700 sold in Canada, have a potential fire hazard linked to their batteries, the US Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) said Tuesday.
  • “The video doorbell’s battery can overheat when the incorrect screws are used for installation,” the CPSC notice said.
  • Ring has received 23 reports of doorbells catching fire and causing property damage in the US, and eight reports of minor burns.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Amazon-owned Ring is recalling 350,000 smart doorbells in the US after reports of some of them catching fire, giving eight people minor burns.

Around 350,000 second-generation Ring video doorbells sold in the US, and about 8,700 more sold in Canada, come with a potential fire hazard linked to the devices’ batteries, according to a Tuesday notice by the US Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC).

Ring, which makes smart doorbells and locks, has so far received 23 reports of doorbells catching fire and causing property damage, the CPSC said. It has also received eight reports of minor burns.

“The video doorbell’s battery can overheat when the incorrect screws are used for installation, posing fire and burn hazards,” the notice said.

The tech company has received 85 incident reports of people using incorrect screws in the device, the CPSC said.

The $US100 doorbells, which are manufactured in China, were sold on Amazon and on Ring’s website from June 2020 through October 2020, according to the notice.

The CPSC has advised customers to not install the recalled video doorbells, and to check on the Ring website if their video doorbell is part of the recall.

In a statement shared with media outlets, including USA Today, Ring said customers did not need to return their devices — instead they should contact the company for new installation instructions.

“We have and continue to work cooperatively with the CPSC on this issue, and have contacted customers who purchased a Ring Video Doorbell (2nd Gen) to ensure they received the updated user manual and follow the device installation instructions,” Ring’s statement said.

A Ring spokesperson told Business Insider: “We have and continue to work cooperatively with the CPSC on this issue, and have contacted customers who purchased a Ring Video Doorbell (2nd Gen) to ensure they received the updated user manual and follow the device installation instructions.”

“Customers do not need to return their devices,” they added.


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Ring’s home-security cameras let people monitor their front porch and home interior using an app. The company was founded in 2012, and was bought by Amazon in February 2018 for at least $US1 billion.

Since its founding, Ring has faced scrutiny for the safety standards of its doorbells. In January, Business Insider reported that hackers could digitally break into people’s homes through the doorbells.

The same month, Ring announced that it was rolling out a privacy dashboard that would let people see who’s logged in to their devices, and that it would require two-factor authentication from customers.