Retail Workers Share Their Worst Blunders At The Cash Register

stress, barista, coffee worker

Photo: Flickr / smee.bruce

The service industry has plenty of drama, long hours, and busy work to put anyone on edge. In a recent Reddit thread, a lot of whipper-snappers confessed they’ve made some horrible blunders on the job, like overcharging customers thousands of dollars because they were panicked. 

Since it’s Friday the 13th (and a slow news day), we’ve picked out a few of their hilarious highlights, edited for clarity, and reprinted them here. 

“It was my second job ever and I charged $500 over the actual total. I started freaking out and getting hives from the anxiety. I had a long line and thought it was irreversible. The couple wasn’t even mad that it happened, they just wanted their money back.” —weusedtodream

“I worked in a busy restaurant full of tourists eating lobster. I ran a family’s Visa through for $4,150. Mortified.”—cherryb0mbr

“Somehow the cafeteria near me deposited $300 into my account, around the same time they gave me a refund. Guess they entered too many zeroes.”—Massive Response 

“I accidentally charged a woman for a printer twice while working at Best Buy in high school … I told my immediate supervisor, who shrugged it off. F— them.”—Ruddose

“Worked at Quizno’s. Typed too fast. Charged $173 for subs. Had to make a few calls to resolve that.”—adanceparty

And on the flipside … 

“When I went to buy a season of ‘Lost’ on Blu Ray somehow it came up as a Justin Bieber CD for $9.99. Cashier was too busy talking to notice.”—Trotwood 

“I worked at a store like Best Buy and sold five office grade printers for the price of one. Never told anyone.”—Jagbag13

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