REPORT: Obama Orders Up Dossier To Justify Syria Strike, US Could Be On Brink Of Attack

By all accounts the U.S. is inching closer to a military strike against Syria.

Earlier this afternoon, Secretary of State John Kerry delivered a stern message against the Assad government and its use of chemical weapons. The response from everyone was the same: war drums!

More reports out this evening suggest that a strike is coming.

CBS News is reporting that Obama has ordered the release of a report that would justify such a strike. Within The White House, there is no longer any disagreement over the necessity of military action against Assad, according to Major Garrett of CBS News.

Fox News has confirmed that four U.S. Navy destroyers are being pre-positioned in the nearby Mediterranean Sea, and CNN is reporting were Obama to give the order, a strike could take place “within hours.”

According to an official speaking to NBC News days ago, a strike would likely be limited in scope:

“If the president wants to send a message” — most likely with limited airstrikes against a few targets — “we’re good at sending messages,” one official said. But if the White House wants to topple Syrian President Bashar Assad, “We’re not able to do that” without a long-term military commitment, the official said.

Calls for a U.S.-led intervention in the two-year-old civil war have intensified in recent days, after an alleged chemical weapons attack on Aug. 21 which produced horrifying video of dead and injured — many of them children.

International human rights group Doctors Without Borders reported Damascus hospitals received approximately 3,600 patients with “neurotoxic symptoms,” 355 of which reportedly died. The Syrian government has repeatedly blamed the rebels for the attack, although U.S. officials harbor “very little doubt” it was the Assad regime.

Despite reports of chemical weapons usage, many Americans are opposed to military action in Syria.

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