Report: MH370 wreckage may have been found in the Philippines

Malaysia authorities have received reports that aeroplane wreckage bearing the nation’s flag, along with human remains, has been discovered on Sugbay Island in the Philippines.

The presence of the Malaysian flag has prompted speculation that the the wreckage may be that of Malaysia Airlines’ missing Flight MH370.

Locals on the island claim to have discovered a wrecked aeroplane fuselage along with the skeletal remains of the passengers and crew, the Daily Mail reported.

According to reports, a teenager stumbled upon the wreckage while hunting for birds in the jungle. Her uncle, an audio-visual technician, contacted authorities to report the finding.

However, the likelihood that MH370 has been found in a Filipino jungle is very low.

This latest discovery doesn’t fit the flight’s projected flight path. Evidence show that MH370 took off from Kuala Lumpur and flew northeast towards China before turning west over the Malay Peninsula. Investigators believe the aircraft then turned south — flying over the southern Indian ocean before crashing after running out of fuel.

The search for the Malaysian jet had been focused on a 7.3-million-square-mile area in the southern Indian Ocean off the western coast of Australia.

In July, a piece from the left wing of the Boeing 777-200ER that operated as MH370 was discovered on the French Territory of Reunion Island, in the Western Indian Ocean nearly 4,800 miles away from the Sugbay Island.

Furthermore, Australia’s News.com reported that Filipino police are baffled, as they have not had any recent reports of a plane crash on the island.

MH370 disappeared on March 8, 2014, while flying from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, to Beijing, China.

The 600,000-pound Boeing 777-200ER — registration number 9M-MRO — vanished with 239 passengers and crew onboard.

Should the wreckage located in the Philippines be from MH370, then many theories about the fate of the missing airliner will be proved incorrect.

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