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The Australian government is investigating whether a one-size-fits-all renunciation method could be applied to all foreign citizenship cases

Australia’s Attorney General George Brandis (L) with Australia’s Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull (R). Photo: Saeed Khan/ AFP/ Getty Images.

The Australian government is investigating whether a one-size-fits-all renunciation method could be applied to all foreign citizenship cases.

According to the Australian Financial Review, it is one of two longer-term options being considered by Attorney-General George Brandis amid the ongoing citizenship debacle.

Senator Brandis told ABC Radio National on Wednesday they were investigating whether the law could be changed “so that there can be an Australian law of renunciation of foreign citizenship”.

While it’s uncertain whether it can be made to work, the idea is thought to be the simplest way to ensure political candidates do not breach the constitution dual citizenship rule in the future.

In new developments, Labor Senator Katy Gallagher is the latest politician to refer herself to the High Court.

Gallagher renounced her citizenship before the last election, but the British Home Office did not process it in time.

She argues she “took all reasonable steps” to renounce her dual citizenship and is confident she will be cleared.

Her lower house colleagues who are in an identical situation — Justine Keay, Susan Lamb and Josh Wilson — will now be under pressure to follow suit.

Fellow lower house Labor MP David Feeney says he renounced his British citizenship in 2007 but cannot find any record of doing so. He has volunteered to be referred to the High Court if no paperwork can be found.

The other option being investigated by Senator Brandis includes changing the Constitution by referendum, although it is the least likely of the two.

The AFR has more here.

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