How To Stop Spam Emails If Your Address Got Stolen This Weekend

spam

Photo: Sonnenbrand via Flickr

After email marketing company Epsilon let millions of email addresses slip this weekend, you should prepare yourself for an onslaught of spam.Major brands like TiVo, Best Buy, and Disney had their email databases compromised, giving away their customers’ first names and email addresses to spammers.

If you are on the email list for any of the affected companies, there’s a quick and easy way to unsubscribe from their email list.

The company Unsubscribe has a service that loads a button on to any major email client that will remove you from just about any email list. All you have to do is click the button, and you will Unsubscribe will handle the rest.

And it’s not just for spammers. We all sign up for product updates, newsletters, and other notifications, and are often too lazy to click that tiny “unsubscribe” link at the bottom of each. The Unsubscribe button is a clear, low impact way to stop receiving those emails.

You can try Unsubscribe’s free trial, which will let you unsubscribe from five emails per month. Unlimited plans start at $2.95 per month. You can also get unlimited lifetime access for a one-time payment of $69.95.

We tested the service out, and found that it integrated perfectly with Gmail. Click the link below to learn how to set it up, but first head over to Unsubscribe’s home page.

Choose the plan your want and fill out your name, email, and payment information.

Click the green button next to the type of email service you use. We use Gmail so we'll select the first option.

The button isn't compatible with all subscription emails. If this happens, just forward the email to [email protected] and the service will do its best to get you off the list.

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