Booze, Painkillers, And Misspent Cash: The Gory Details Of The Red Sox Collapse Are In

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The details of the Red Sox’ epic collapse last September are in, and they’re not pretty.An in-depth Boston Globe feature today describes the collapse as “a story of disunity, disloyalty, and dysfunction like few others in franchise history.”

There were the pitchers who ate chicken and drank beer during games.

There was a manager distracted with a litany of marital and health problems.

And much, much more.

Beckett, Lester, and Lackey would drink beer, eat fried chicken, and play video games during games

The three pricey pitchers would hang out in the clubhouse while their team was out on the field. As a result, the clubhouse split, and they got out of shape.

Francona vehemently denied both claims to the Globe. He says he worked harder than ever this season, and was not distracted.

But the Globe cited sources saying Francona was living in a hotel all season, and Francona himself admitted to consulting a doctor about his painkiller use (the doctor said he was not abusing them).

The owners were aloof, and may have been distracted after buying Liverpool FC

John Henry and Fenway Ventures didn't have a handle on how bad things were getting in Boston. They were unaware players were drinking during games, for one.

Players were angry that the team made them play a double-header when Hurricane Irene was coming, so ownership bought them $300 headphones

Players were angry about have to play a doubleheader after just playing 14 of 17 on the road. Management tried to appease them, but they remained ticked off.

Terry Francona held a closed door meeting on the eve of the collapse, but his players ignored him

After the Sox were killed on September 7, Francona tried to rally the troops with a closed-door meeting.

According to the Globe, 'His players responded by failing to adjust their attitudes or improve their slipshod performances.'

Not everyone was on board with Theo Epstein pulling the trigger on Carl Crawford

Epstein signed Crawford to a seven-year, $142 million deal. But the outfielder was a disappointment. Epstein also whiffed on reliever Bobby Jenks.

Ownership was 'divided' on Crawford from the beginning, with some people thinking he was too similar a player to Jacoby Ellsbury.

Kevin Youkilis wasn't a leader, he stopped caring after he got injured

The Globe describes Youkilis as 'detached' and 'short-tempered' after getting hurt late in the season.

Adrian Gonzalez wasn't a leader, he got tired

Gonzalez faltered down the stretch. Even worse, he complained about it publicly.

The team suffered from a lack of leadership, and the big-money first basemen didn't help.

Jacoby Ellsbury wasn't a leader, he only talked to Jed Lowrie

Ellsbury had the best season of any Red Sox player.

While the sources in the article say he played hard all the way through, 'he contributed little to the clubhouse culture' by only hanging out with Jed Lowrie.

Tim Wakefield wasn't a leader, he only cared about himself

Many people were rubbed the wrong way when Wakefield said that he hoped the Red Sox would bring him back in 2012 so he could set the team all-time wins record.

But worst of all...

As ugly as these details are, the real story is that they are coming out at all.

Who are these anonymous sources throwing Francona, Epstein, and a half-dozen players under the bus? How bad has it gotten in Boston?

Not a good sign going forward.

Read the entire Globe piece here for the whole story >>

Now remember how they looked after the fall

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