Really Fat People Costing U.S. Economy $117 Billion A Year

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The nation’s obesity epidemic does far more harm than simply making riding subways a pain and going to ballgames uncomfortable. There’s a huge price tag on it, too.

Reuters give us the rundown this morning.

•About two-thirds of adults over age 20 in the United States are considered overweight or obese. 30-two per cent are obese, according to the U.S. centres for Disease Control and Prevention.

 

•In 2007, only one state, Colorado, had a prevalence of obesity less than 20 per cent. 30 states had a prevalence equal to or greater than 25 per cent; Mississippi, Alabama and Tennessee had a prevalence of obesity equal to or greater than 30 per cent.

•The direct and indirect costs of being overweight or obese is $117 billion per year, according the a 2000 report by the Office of the U.S. Surgeon General.

•Once considered a problem only in high-income countries, obesity is rising in low and middle income countries, particularly in urban areas.

 

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