"Protoscar Has Done An Epic Job At Wasting $1.4 Million"

The Protoscar Lampo is a prototype electric built to show off what can be done with various technologies for an electric car. It’s not intended to be manufactured and sold to the public.

That’s a good idea. The car costs about $1.4 million. If it were produced in larger volumes the price might fall to a third of that, which is still way too much for anyone to buy it. And even if they could, it looks like there’s no reason.

Jalopnik had a European correspondant take the EV for a test drive. The one sentence review: “All in all, speaking in pure car terms, it’s safe to say that Protoscar has done an epic job at wasting $1.4 million.”

Here’s a snippet of the trashing:

If you spend a six-figured amount on a car, you’ll want it to fire on all cylinders or whatever that translates to in EV-speak. The Lampo doesn’t. In theory its twin motors and battery packs running the front and back wheels separately are good for 268 HP and 325 Lb-Ft of torque, but for “technical reasons” the power output has to be limited to somewhere in the region of 60 % during our test drive. Maximum speed is supposed to be over 125 MPH, but it’s been restricted to 75 MPH. Hard acceleration is also out of the question, as that may upset the batteries and cause all sorts of problems. Problems like fire.

Add to that the fact sharp right turns will make the inside of the fender eat into the right front tire, the giant red emergency stop button is cleverly placed on top of the armrest, right where your arm rests, and the seriously multifunctional dashboard display, which is completely unreadable unless you pull over to take a closer look at it. The multi-function screen in the mid-console should be able to show remaining range after calculating the road’s undulations, but is, in fact, not able to do that at all. What it will do is let you turn power steering on and off, if you can find the right submenu.

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