Protesters are comparing Trump to Hitler outside of Twitter's headquarters

Matt Weinberger / Business InsiderA projector displays the message ‘Would Twitter ban Hitler?’ on the side of Twitter HQ.

SAN FRANCISCO — Around 20 protesters gathered outside of Twitter’s headquarters on Thursday evening to challenge the company’s role in being a key communication tool for President Donald Trump.

A projector set up by the protestors displayed messages on the side of Twitter’s building comparing Trump to Hitler, according to a Business Insider reporter at the site.

Protesters also chanted messages like “Uphold your policy, ban Donald trump” and “We need a leader, not a creepy tweeter.”

A Twitter spokesperson declined to comment on the protest when reached by Business Insider.

Twitter has said in the past that it will ban Trump, who now uses the handles @realDonaldTrump and @POTUS, if he violates the company’s hate-speech rules. Thursday’s protest was organised through a Facebook event that calls Twitter a “mouthpiece of fascism” for allowing Trump on the service.

Matt Weinberger / Business InsiderA protester carries a sign that compares Trump to Hitler.

“Twitter is allowing itself to be the mouthpiece of fascism and the greatest propaganda machine the world has ever known,” the protest’s Facebook event reads. “To this we say no. Twitter endangers the world by amplifying Dishonest Donald’s ignorance in regards to foreign policy and nuclear proliferation. To this we say no.”

Thursday’s protest follows a similar demonstration outside of Uber’s headquarters last week, which protested its CEO Travis Kalanick’s role in Trump’s economic advisory team.

Matt Weinberger / Business InsiderA projector displays the message ‘#NoTwitterforTrump’ on the side of Twitter HQ.

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