Drunk-Driving PE Manager Smashes His Porsche Into The 2ND Story Of A House In Connecticut

car jumping explosion

Photo: Horrorphile

Russell Stidolph, the founder and managing director of energy private equity fund AltEnergy, was driving his Porsche Carerra so fast one night last November that he shot the car into the second story of a house in Connecticut.Obviously we don’t condone drunk driving, but that’s almost impressive. Luckily, no-one was seriously injured.

(Bless Dealbreaker for alerting us to this one!)

So here’s what happened.

The homeowner, Lisa Brinton-Thomson said she was in bed at the time.

“I thought a plane had crashed into the house. It shook the whole structure.”

So on November 19th at about 11:30 pm, she called the authorities to her property, 24 Highland Ave in Rowayton;Greenwich Time says

When the police arrived they discovered Stidolph wedged inside the back seat of his demolished Porsche, which was overturned, on the front yard of the house.

When the police found the driver, “he was laying there, squished in the back seat.”

For pictures of the incident, click here >

Where the Porsche crashed into the second story

Sidenote: So maybe not wearing a seatbelt (illegal in CT) saved his life?As far as what happened pre-crash, authorities are still trying to piece it together.

According to Greenwich Time, from the direction of tire marks and gouges on a median, police think that the Porsche, hit a median strip and then:

shear[ed] the stop sign pole three inches above the ground… became airborne and flew over Highland Avenue before crashing into a two-foot stone wall belonging to the home on 24 Highland Ave. The vehicle flew a total of 42 feet before crashing into the centre support and porch roof overhang to the second floor of the house.

We won’t know how fast Stidolph was driving until police analyse the control box inside the car.

When police asked him what happened he, not surprisingly, couldn’t remember. It turns out Stidolph’s blood alcohol level was more than twice the legal limit. Amazingly, his injuries were limited to a few cuts and bruises.

He turned himself into police after a judge signed a warrant charing him with drink driving. Stidoph’s arraignment is on January 13.

Luckily, he’s CEO, so he doesn’t have to worry about being fired.

In case anyone’s concerned about the Porsche, obviously it was a write-off.According to The Hour,

[Its] headlight, pieces of its radiator and other badly-damaged car parts were strewn about the lawn along with branches from a large hedge column and bits of metal and plastic. The grill of the Porsche was still on the home’s second-story roof.

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