PODCAST: With Mark Textor on disillusioned voters and the hunt for fresh economic policy ideas

(L-R) Mark Textor, co-founder of campaign strategy firm Crosby|Textor; BI economics correspondent David Scutt, and BI editor-in-chief Paul Colgan.

The radical economic policies of populist leaders like US President Donald Trump have renewed the interest of the business and finance communities in politics, after what seems like decades of western governments with highly centrist economic agendas.

Voters in western countries around the world are casting votes for more radical candidates by the millions, in an environment of low wages growth, rising inequality, and disenchantment with the political class.

Mark Textor, as a pollster for both the Coalition in Australia and the British Conservative Party, has a closer understanding of the underlying drivers of this mood shift than most. He joined us on this week’s episode of our economics podcast, Devils and Details, to talk through the resurgence in the primacy of policy and politics in economics.

He discusses:

  • How governments “age” more quickly in the modern media age
  • The struggle for conventional politics in offering people hope
  • How countries seem to be in the national equivalent of a dead-end job
  • Generational divisions among voters in Australia and the UK
  • The failure of businesses to make a coherent case for policy reform

Naturally, there’s lots more besides. You can find the show on iTunes, where you can rate us or leave a review, or you can listen in below.

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