Please Stop Using These 15 Words In Your LinkedIn Profile IMMEDIATELY

Nicole WilliamsNicole Williams, career advice author and LinkedIn’s Connection Director

Photo: Nicolewilliams.com

LinkedIn has scoured the profiles of its 187 million members and come up with a new list of overused, useless buzzwords.┬áThese are the words that can be an instant turnoff to a recruiter who sees them over and over again because they show that you aren’t “dynamic” with great “communication skills,” but the opposite.

“You wouldn’t mention how disorganized or irresponsible you are, and their antonyms (organised, trustworthy, etc) are wasted words too,” explains LinkedIn’s Nicole Williams.

So, if you are using any of these 2012 buzzwords, fire up your LinkedIn profile right now and scrub them out. Here they are, in order of how overused they are:

  • Creative
  • Organizational
  • Effective
  • Motivated
  • Extensive Experience
  • Track Record
  • Innovative
  • Responsible
  • Analytical
  • Problem Solving

A few other buzzwords made the list for countries outside the United States. No matter where you live, consider ditching these from your profile, too.

  • Experimental (a buzzword in Brazil)
  • Multinational (a buzzword in Egypt and Indonesia)
  • specialised (a buzzword in Spain)

By the way, even though some of the buzzwords from 2011 didn’t make the Top 10 in 2012, that doesn’t mean they’ve become good words to use again. So, you’ll still want to avoid these:

  • Communication skills
  • Dynamic

Don’t miss: 13 New Ways To Make Your LinkedIn Profile Irresistible

Now watch below why President Obama, Richard Branson and everyone else need to be on LinkedIn:


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