Pinterest just brought back a big way for its users to make money

Pinterest is bringing back the top way that its users make money from the site.

Last year, the company banned affiliate links, which gave Pinners a cut of the sale when other users bought one of the products that they had posted. At the time, Pinterest said that it outlawed that practice because affiliate links and redirects had caused “irrelevant Pins in feeds, broken links and other spammy behaviour.”

But some loyal users felt upset, since they’d lost an income stream — although Pinners could still get paid to curate boards or do other brand sponsorships, those opportunities weren’t as accessible.

Almost exactly a year later, though, Pinterest says it decided to bringing affiliate capabilities back as a way to reward its users and because it has strengthened its spam technology enough to weed out bad behaviour.

Pinterest, like most social sites including Facebook and Twitter, depends on its users to create all the content that it can sell ads between, so it needs people willing to put a lot of time into its platform. Although a spokesperson assures us that it wasn’t seeing a decline in posting after banning affiliate links, the company admits that it wasn’t doing enough to support the people it depended on.

“Because we weren’t allowing affiliates, we weren’t given users the right sort of incentive to continue creating really beautiful content,”Adelin Cai, from Pinterest’s policy team, tells Business Insider. “We believe that if we remove the ban, we’ll incentivizing those influencers to generate much more beautiful content.”

NOW WATCH: There’s a Keurig-inspired machine that makes individual tortillas

NOW WATCH: Tech Insider videos

Want to read a more in-depth view on the trends influencing Australian business and the global economy? BI / Research is designed to help executives and industry leaders understand the major challenges and opportunities for industry, technology, strategy and the economy in the future. Sign up for free at research.businessinsider.com.au.