PHOTOS: Brazil's Slums Are Reborn After Gang Crackdown

brazil's favelas

Photo: AP

Brazil started a crackdown on crime two years ago to fend off a social crisis and clean up for the World Cup and the Olympics.The $260 billion PAC initiative aimed at improving transport and infrastructure, the energy sector and the country’s urban landscape and social projects. More recently the military has been called in to maintain order; with a peacekeeping force fighting gangs on the streets of  Rio de Janeiro.

In recent weeks the slums are showing signs of a renaissance — which could provide a huge boost to the emerging market.

Rio de Janeiro has 700 slums

Vidigal in Rio de Janeiro with a view of the Ipanema beach.

The largest slum, Rocinha, has a population of 250,000

Source: Financial Times

The government created a $260 billion plan to invest in the favelas to improve infrastructure and support the economy

A man carries a container of bottles next to electric wires at the Santa Marta slum in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Tuesday, Jan. 4, 2011. In 2008 police stormed Santa Marta to evict the dealers as the community became the pilot in a program to root out gangs and bring government services to slums long abandoned by the state. The program has since been replicated in a dozen slums, all in a bid to make one of the world's more dangerous cities safer before the 2014 World Cup and the 2016 Olympics. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

Rio de Janeiro's government asked for army and naval assistance after gangs reportedly burned 100s of cars, buses and taxis

A police officer patrols during an operation to take control of the Morro Sao Joao slum in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Thursday Jan. 6, 2011. Rio de Janeiro's police say they've taken over three adjacent slums as part of an ongoing program to increase security and clamp down on drug trafficking. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

Source: NPR

In a new phase of the initiative police will now report to the military

A police officer speaks with a resident through a window, not seen, during a police operation to take control of the Morro Sao Joao slum in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Thursday Jan. 6, 2011. Rio de Janeiro's police say they've taken over three adjacent slums as part of an ongoing program to increase security and clamp down on drug trafficking. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

Source: Miami Herald

Police they say they've found 700 pounds of cocaine, 34 tons of marijuana and hundreds of old weapons

Police frisk men before letting them go during a police operation to take control of the Morro Sao Joao slum at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Thursday Jan. 6, 2011. Rio de Janeiro's police say they've taken over three adjacent slums as part of an ongoing program to increase security and clamp down on drug trafficking. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

Source: Miami Herald

Santa Marta in Rio was one of the first to be targeted for a 'clean-up'

In this photo taken Dec. 17, 2010, Gustavo Nascimento da Silva, 5, flies his kite at the Santa Marta slum in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. In 2008 police stormed Santa Marta to evict the dealers as the community became the pilot in a program to root out gangs and bring government services to slums long abandoned by the state. The program has since been replicated in a dozen slums, all in a bid to make one of the world's more dangerous cities safer before the 2014 World Cup and the 2016 Olympics. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

Suddenly slum businesses are getting visits from tourists and middle class Brazilians

Boys sit outside a grocery store at the Santa Marta slum in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Tuesday, Jan. 4, 2011. In 2008 police stormed Santa Marta to evict the dealers as the community became the pilot in a program to root out gangs and bring government services to slums long abandoned by the state. The program has since been replicated in a dozen slums, all in a bid to make one of the world's more dangerous cities safer before the 2014 World Cup and the 2016 Olympics. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

Source: NPR

This barbershop used to serve drug dealers and addicts. Not any more

Costumers have their hair cut at the Ze do Carmo barbershop at the Santa Marta slum in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Tuesday, Jan. 4, 2011. From his barbershop carved into the steep flank of the hillside slum where he grew up, Jose do Carmo used to cut the hair of the neighbourhood's drug dealers and of the addicts who walked up the narrow alleyways for a fix and stayed for the $5 trims. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

Source: Miami Herald

The government plans to keep 2000 soldiers on the street everyday

A child peers from his home as he watches police patrol as part of an operation to take control of the Morro da Matriz slum at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Thursday Jan. 6, 2011. Rio de Janeiro's police say they've taken over three adjacent slums as part of an ongoing program to increase security and clamp down on drug trafficking. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

Source: Miami Herald

Increased security in the favelas has seen rent go up 400%

In this photo taken Dec. 17, 2010, Leidemar Barreto stands outside her home at the Santa Marta slum in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. In 2008 police stormed Santa Marta to evict the dealers as the community became the pilot in a program to root out gangs and bring government services to slums long abandoned by the state. The program has since been replicated in a dozen slums, all in a bid to make one of the world's more dangerous cities safer before the 2014 World Cup and the 2016 Olympics. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

Source: NPR

Now the streets are unusually quiet

In this photo taken Dec. 17, 2010, Michel da Silva, 8, walks down an alley at the Santa Marta slum in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. In 2008 police stormed Santa Marta to evict the dealers as the community became the pilot in a program to root out gangs and bring government services to slums long abandoned by the state. The program has since been replicated in a dozen slums, all in a bid to make one of the world's more dangerous cities safer before the 2014 World Cup and the 2016 Olympics. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

Source: Miami Herald

And safe

In this photo taken Dec. 17, 2010 residents play table tennis at the Santa Marta slum in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. In 2008 police stormed Santa Marta to evict the dealers as the community became the pilot in a program to root out gangs and bring government services to slums long abandoned by the state. The program has since been replicated in a dozen slums, all in a bid to make one of the world's more dangerous cities safer before the 2014 World Cup and the 2016 Olympics. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

It's not easy to save a city, but it can be done...

Business Insider Emails & Alerts

Site highlights each day to your inbox.

Follow Business Insider Australia on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Instagram.