A California dad is the first parent to say he will plead guilty in the college admissions scandal

  • Peter Sartorio, from Menlo Park, California, is the first parent to say he will plead guilty as part of the college admissions scandal.
  • He has been charged with conspiracy to commit mail fraud and honest-services mail fraud.
  • Sartorio, a packaged-foods entrepreneur, is accused of paying $US15,000 to have his daughter’s ACT exam answers corrected as part of the scheme.
  • Visit INSIDER’s homepage for more.

A packaged-foods entrepreneur from California is the first parent to say he will plead guilty in the college admissions scandal.

Peter Sartorio, from Menlo Park, California, is accused of paying $US15,000 to have his daughter’s ACT exam answers corrected,according to a criminal complaint filed in March.

Sartorio, the cofounder of Elena’s Food Specialties, is one of 33 parents accused of paying up to $US6.5 million to get their children into top universities as part of a scheme that prosecutors say included bribing college coaches and entrance-exam administrators.

The entrepreneur’s lawyer filed a motion in Massachusetts US District Court on Wednesday asking for his initial court appearance to be moved to April 30 on the grounds that “he intends to plead guilty to an Information that the government has advised it will file prior to April 30 2019,” court documents seen by INSIDER said.

Sartorio is the first parent to say he will plead guilty in the case, according to ABC 7.


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While the court documents don’t say what Sartorio will plead guilty to, he has been charged with conspiracy to commit mail fraud and honest-services mail fraud.

Prosecutors say Sartorio paid Rick Singer, the man accused of orchestrating the scheme, to have his daughter’s ACT score corrected.

She earned a 27 out of 36 on the exam, landing her in the 86th percentile, the criminal complaint said. It was her first time taking the ACT, but prosecutors said the teen scored in the 41st and 52nd percentiles on her PSATs.

No students have been charged in the scandal, and prosecutors said last month that many were unaware of the scheme.

Several of the parents charged in the scandal appeared in court in Boston on Wednesday, including the actresses Lori Loughlin and Felicity Huffman.

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