Paris Saint-Germain earns more than its 14 league rivals combined

Thiago SilvaGetty ImagesThiago Silva is one of the many expensive players PSG can afford thanks to Qatar’s backing.

French football team Paris Saint-Germain (PSG) generated more income last year than 14 of its rivals combined, according to Bloomberg.

As Business Insider previously reported, PSG’s revenue hit €484 million (£380 million; $547 million) in the 2014/15 season.

This is more than four times that of AS Monaco, the French league’s second biggest revenue taker, and more than the 14 other teams in French league put together.

The income discrepancy is even bigger than the English Premier League, as teams in that share tv revenue and can earn money based on table placings.

PSG’s income pushed the French league’s total revenue to €1.4 billion, Bloomberg added, and without PSG the other 19 teams earned €941 million in total.

As much as €297 million of PSG’s revenue is down to lucrative commercial deals, including a renewed kit deal with Nike, according to the Deloitte Football Money League report. The team also has sponsor ships with Emirates, American Express and the Qatar Tourism Authority.

In 2011 Qatar Sports Investments became a 70% shareholder in PSG, paying just €50 million but also taking on its considerable debts and past season losses.

This allowed PSG to buy some of the world’s best — and most expensive — players, including Zlatan Ibrahimovic, Thiago Silva and Angel Di Maria.

PSG had a particularly successful season last year, as it became the first ever team to complete the French domestic treble of Ligue 1, Coupe de France and Coupe de la Ligue.

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