Firing Season: 171 Layoffs At 9 Web Companies

All those memos from VCs about trimming the fat — startups took them very seriously. Several companies announced layoffs this week, and it will just be the beginning. We already reported Heavy.com’s layoffs; here’s a roundup of the others from the week that was.

  • Pandora: The popular music site cut 20 jobs, reducing its ranks from 140 to 120.
  • Hi5: The social net that’s particularly big in Spain cut 10-15, according to TechCrunch. Ironically, the news came a day after a big feature in Fortune on how they were gunning for Facebook.
  • Zivity: The “adult-community” cut 8 of its 22 employees. The company, funded to the tune of $8 million, has yet to officially open its doors yet — that’s expected in 2009.
  • Adbrite: Probably the only layoff story where you can let yourself feel a little bit of schadenfreude. The ad market place, founded by F*ked Company’s Phillip Kaplan, cut 40 of its 100 employees. If you can believe it, the company says the cuts have nothing to do with performance.
  • Seesmic: This was actually last Friday. The uber-hyped “Twitter for video” startup cut 7 jobs. CEO Loic Lemeur explained the move in a Seesmic-powered video, seen here.
  • Redfin: Hot web real estate firm cut 20. We discussed it here.
  • SearchMe: The visual search engine that sorts webpages like album covers on iTunes cut 20% of its staff, or about 10 jobs, VentureBeat first reported. This is another Sequoia, which raised a whopping $25 million back in March.
  • Zillow: Another web real estate firm, just announced that it was cutting 25% of staff — which was reported to be 155, so that’s about 39 jobs.

Add it altogether, just from these 9 companies, that’s about 171 jobs lost in a week. Those numbers will get much bigger soon, particularly when Yahoo finally rolls out its cuts.

NOW WATCH: Tech Insider videos

Want to read a more in-depth view on the trends influencing Australian business and the global economy? BI / Research is designed to help executives and industry leaders understand the major challenges and opportunities for industry, technology, strategy and the economy in the future. Sign up for free at research.businessinsider.com.au.