Oracle paid well for Maxymiser, says person close to the company

We’re still trying to discover details on Oracle’s purchase of New York marketing-tech company
Maxymiser earlier this week.

Sadly, we do not have a number to share, but a source close to the company did tell us that Oracle paid a decent price for the company, telling us, “Generally the news is very positive for all stake holders.”

So, sounds like this was a strategic acquisition of a thriving company — not a struggling company picked up for a bargain.

Maxymiser was founded in 2006 and had about 400 employees who are joining Oracle. It raised about $US15 million in VC funding plus an undisclosed private equity round.

Oracle isn’t necessarily a cheapskate when it comes to acquisitions, particularly for its up-and-coming marketing cloud. It bought Eloqua for $US810 million, Responsys for $US1.5 billion, and it reportedly bought Datalogix for $US1.2 billion late last year, though it didn’t disclose that big price tag. We’ve also been told it bought Big Machines for about $US400 million.

But Oracle can also often be an opportunistic bargain shopper. For instance, after cloud computing company Nebula announced it was closing its doors, Oracle swooped in and hired its 40 engineers, offering them generous packages that ranged from $US200,000 to $US1 million, sources told us. But it didn’t acquire the whole company, much less pay top dollar for it.

So, from what we’re hearing, the Maxymiser deal wasn’t a l0w-ball offer, but a decent one, at least for the major stake owners.

We’re still asking around, so if you’ve got information on this deal you’d like to share, we invite you to drop us a line, [email protected]nsider.com.

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